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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Petone, NZ
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    Default Tanner 12" Thicknesser.

    I bought a Tanner thicknesser. To supplement my 12" Makita thicknesser.

    I've wanted a more substantial thicknesser for a while. I have a few Wadkins, but their thicknessers take up too much space - an important consideration in my shrinking garage/workshop. I part owned a Tanner thicknesser in the 1970s (in a yellow and brown livery) and was keen to pick up another. I'm also proud to add a New Zealand made machine to my collection.

    I've always been a bottom feeder (and now that I'm retired that's not going to change), so this one is not plug and play.

    Tann1.jpg Tann3.jpg Seller's photos.

    But it's not too bad - some surface rust, a gouge in the feed roller, an anti-kickback roller (and spacer) missing...

    Tann4.jpg

    ...and the feed speed lever broken off.

    Tann2.jpg

    I've contacted The Powertool Centre in Whangarei (who bought all the spare parts when Tanner shut up shop) but they're not able to help with a spare handle, nor a spare kick-back roller.

    It's 3-phase with an Australian built 3hp GMF Cadet motor.

    Thanks to tumbyrory who put up a PDF of a Tanner manual last year.

    Quote Originally Posted by tumbyrory View Post
    Hi, I'm new to this forum (any forum for that matter) I have got a 12" Tanner thicknesser & it came with some instructions...
    It's not going to get a full overhaul anytime soon, but I hope to get it ready for a trial run over the next month or two.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
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    Default Electricals.

    It appears to have been hard-wired when last in use (the PO hadn't used it) so there was no plug.

    And it has another problem - the DOL starter has had a serious knock.

    Tann5.jpg Tann6.jpg

    Note the chunk missing out of the corner, and there's a crack going half-way down the base. That's going to be too dangerous to reuse.

    I've spent a bit of time over the last few days selecting, de-rusting and repainting some replacement components. A PDL isolating switch (keeping up that New Zealand made theme), and a PDL/MEM starter.

    Tann7.jpg

    Note: both PDL and MEM stamped into the sheetmetal housing. I think PDL imported MEM (Midland Electric Manufacturing Co. of UK) components and mounted them in their own housings, as a way around the import restrictions of the 1950s, 60s and early 70s.

    Tann8.jpg

    I also found that the wiring from the original starter to the motor was showing its age - so that's getting replaced as well. And I've got a 3-phase plug on a lead somewhere...

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    In between houses
    Posts
    1,784

    Default

    Does that black lever with the chromey locking handle adjust the table rollers up and down?

  5. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Black Lever & Chromey Locking Handle.

    Quote Originally Posted by riverbuilder View Post
    Does that black lever with the chromey locking handle adjust the table rollers up and down?
    I had to go check it out. The thicknesser is in a corner covered with stuff (something to do with not having told SWMBO that I have it ) so it's not easy to get to. It turns out it is for adjusting the height of the table rollers.

    Here's what the manual has to say:
    Quote Originally Posted by the manual
    TABLE ROLLERS:

    Adjustment of table rollers is provided for by a single lever to the right of the table. Both rollers are adjusted in the one movement and at both ends of the roller. Quick adjustments are thus possible when different timbers are being used. After adjusting the lever should be securely clamped in position.
    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Rockhampton
    Posts
    439

    Default

    Almost bought one of these myself a few times. I am a bit like you Vann.... no space for the machines that you would really love. Have always thought the Tanner would be a good starter Thicknesser..Small enough to fit the space yet a serious machine.
    Gaza

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
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    Default My Old Tanner.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    ...I part owned a Tanner thicknesser in the 1970s (in a yellow and brown livery)...
    I've spent some time on a long delayed (covid ) trip to Auckland. While there I visited the guy who bought my half of that Tanner. He still has it.

    Tanner2a.jpg Tanner2b.jpg Surrounded by junk, I managed to get a photo of one side and the back.

    It's not in use - but he was unwilling to sell me parts, as he wanted to eventually sell it 'complete' (if not actually 'working'). I'm not a great fan of green machines - if I ever get around to repainting mine I might try the same yellow and brown livery.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
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    66
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    2,661

    Default Electricals - pt.2.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    ...I've spent a bit of time over the last few days selecting, de-rusting and repainting some replacement components...
    I wanted to run steel conduit between the two metal boxes. Unfortunately the isolating switch box had knock-outs for 1" conduit and I didn't want to use anything larger than 3/4" (as most of my spare conduit fittings are 5/8" or 3/4"). In the process of adapting what I had, I managed to gouge the paint on the switch box and then needed to strip it back to bare metal and start again.

    Out of interest: PDL boxes had a "silvered" finish. I etch-primed the box, then sprayed a silver enamel. This was much too bright. But a coat of clear spray resulted in an almost prefect match.

    I then spent a morning last week positioning, drilling and tapping holes (3/16" BSW) and mounting the switch boxes.

    Tanner10.jpg Note that only the outside of the boxes were re-painted .

    Edit: I forgot to mention, I had mounted the the DOL starter on my workbench and after cleaning the contacts I connected it to the 3-phase mains supply. When I pushed the "On" button the coil magnetised and held the contacts together as it should. I then wired in the motor (also clamped to my workbench). It fired up and ran smoothly. So all is in working order.

    The only problem is a slight wobble in the pulley. I don't think the motor is the original (mounting holes don't match the slots in the mounting plate) and I wonder if the pulley isn't a good fit. It's only a slight wobble so we'll see how it goes.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
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    Default Electricals - pt.3.

    From the DOL starter to the electric motor I'll use steel flexible conduit. I found a suitable length, clean and etch-primed it. Here it is just hanging around this morning, awaiting black spray enamel.

    Tanner12.jpg With a 10" crescent helping keep the conduit stretched.

    At the motor end, the flex conduit needs an angled terminator. This one is 5/8" BS conduit while the hole in the motor terminal box is 3/4", so I need an adaptor.

    Tanner13.jpg Tanner14.jpg Keeping with the "made in New Zealand" theme it's a PDL product.

    The other end needs a straight terminator. I've already fitted it through a knock-out in the back of the DOL starter box.

    Tanner11.jpg Just need a couple of plugs for the two spare knock-out holes.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
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    Default Electricals - pt.4.

    A little more done today (remembering I have to do this while SWMBO isn't looking).

    First I fitted the angled conduit terminator, adaptor, and conduit (one end only). Then I wired in the motor.

    Tanner15.jpg Tanner16.jpg

    Next I moved the motor onto the motor shelf in the thicknesser base. It's not fixed down yet, but I was now able to pass all the wires through to the DOL starter box and terminate the other end of the conduit.

    Tanner18.jpg Tanner17.jpg

    I haven't yet found plugs for the two spare knock-out holes - but apart from those it's ready to have the DOL starter and isolating switch connected.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Sunshine Coast, QLD
    Posts
    352

    Default

    Looks a nice compact machine, looking at where the motor sits in the cabinet, it might be worth mounting it on some firm rubber pads, to help absorb some vibration.

  12. #11
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    Default Electricals - pt.5.

    Quote Originally Posted by Camelot View Post
    ...looking at where the motor sits in the cabinet, it might be worth mounting it on some firm rubber pads, to help absorb some vibration.
    A brilliant idea. I cut some squares of 1/8" rubber today. When I bolt the motor down I'll sit it on them first.

    Today's progress. Wiring completed (apart from those pesky plugs for the redundant knock-outs ).

    Tanner19.jpg Tanner20.jpg

    Before I put the cover back on the DOL starter, I checked the motor amps. 4.4amps according to the motor tag - so I set the overload at a little under 5amps.

    I will have to run it to check the motor turns the right way.

    Where it sits in the garage it's out of reach of 3-phase power. I intend to mount this machine on wheels so I can move it out of the way at the end of the day. I guess the trolley is my next project.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  13. #12
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sth Gippsland Vic
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    Nifty Belt tension mechanism with that adjustable shelf!

  14. #13
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    Petone, NZ
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    Default She Runs.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    ...Where it sits in the garage it's out of reach of 3-phase power. I intend to mount this machine on wheels so I can move it out of the way at the end of the day. I guess the trolley is my next project.
    Well it's been two months. I made a trolley (wooden) with fixed casters at one end and swivelling casters t'other. No photos - I'll have to take some tomorrow. It was a mission getting it on the trolley - I had to take the motor and motor shelf back out. With all that cast iron up top and just sheetmetal at the base, she's a bit top heavy.

    A bit more tidying in my garage and I was able to roll it closer to a power supply. I plugged it in and... nothing . That was about three weeks ago.

    I just couldn't face working through the electrics to find the problem so I did my usual trick - avoidance. Anything but face the problem .

    Tann4.jpg

    As part of my avoidance I removed the anti-kickback rollers and de-rusted them.
    - And derusted and painted the spacers (again, no photos).
    - I attacked the feed roller with a wire brush and got rid of that rust too.
    - The table has been "shaved" of surface rust and waxed.
    - The RH side cover has been off and the bare cast iron inside has been painted (red oxide).
    - The feed rollers chain and sprockets have been removed, cleaned, oiled and reassembled.
    - The LH side cover is off, the gearbox drained cleaned and replenished with fresh oil.
    - The quadrant on the left has been stripped, repainted (black), and the "stop", "slow" and "fast" picked out in red.
    - The broken feed speed handle has a temporary repair (a short length of broom handle, as my woodlathe has a problem so I can't turn up a handle).
    - And a few other bits and pieces have been cleaned/derusted, etc.

    Anyway last week I checked the three phase extension cord - check. And continuity between the plug and isolating switch - check. And between the isolating switch and contactor - check. Hmmm... . Must have burnt out the contactor coil or damaged something disconnecting and reconnecting the wiring to the contactor when I took the motor out .

    Today I took another look. Line in connected to the wrong side of the contactor .

    I swapped the wires over and pushed the "Start" button. She goes . And the correct rotation too .

    Then I reconnected the vee belts, tightened down the motor and switched it on - and immediately off. No flying knives (I did a quick check beforehand and they seemed tight).

    After a few more tests I tried feeding a piece of timber through. It went through, but not willingly - I need to adjust the rollers and the pressure bars. Also, the adjustment knobs are all wrong.

    The outer bolts adjust the rollers. The inner bolts adjust the pressure bars. The inner ones should have the knurled knobs.

    Adjusters1.jpg My Tanner.

    Adjusters2.jpg The correct arrangement (photo from the internet).

    That can be the weekend's project (along with taking some photos).

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    ...I removed the anti-kickback rollers and de-rusted them.
    - And derusted and painted the spacers (again, no photos).
    - I attacked the feed roller with a wire brush and got rid of that rust too.
    - The table has been "shaved" of surface rust and waxed.
    - The RH side cover has been off and the bare cast iron inside has been painted (red oxide).
    - The feed rollers chain and sprockets have been removed, cleaned, oiled and reassembled.
    - The LH side cover is off, the gearbox drained cleaned and replenished with fresh oil.
    - The quadrant on the left has been stripped, repainted (black), and the "stop", "slow" and "fast" picked out in red.
    - The broken feed speed handle has a temporary repair...
    Before and after:

    Tann4.jpg

    T27.jpg Note the wooden speed control handle at left.

    And with the RH side cover removed.

    T29.jpg

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  16. #15
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    Sep 2008
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    Petone, NZ
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    ...I need to adjust the rollers and the pressure bars. Also, the adjustment knobs are all wrong.

    The outer bolts adjust the rollers. The inner bolts adjust the pressure bars. The inner ones should have the knurled knobs.

    Adjusters1.jpg My Tanner.

    Adjusters2.jpg The correct arrangement (photo from the internet).

    That can be the weekend's project (along with taking some photos).

    Well that turned into a mission.

    I could see there were few a few "issues" so I ended up completely removing the infeed roller and pressure bar.

    Here's an exploded view of the roller adjuster.

    Tan21.jpg

    - The stud and nut are 1/4" BSW.
    - The hollow bolt is 1/2" BSW - bored a good clearance for the 1/4" stud to pass through.
    - The spring fits through a tapped 12" hole, and a 1/4" stud passes through.
    - The stud is fixed into the bronze bearing.

    The thread on one of the two studs is in a bad way.

    Tan22.jpg Thread on the LH stud has been in the wars.

    I'll have to look see if I have a 1/4" BSW die nut. I'd like to try to repair the thread before resorting to making a new stud.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

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