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  1. #1
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    Default Wadkin LQ restoration

    Here we go again folks. This is a wadkin LQ recessor. I think this to be one of the most overlooked machines out their. They generally sell for peanuts and are really useful machines which can bore, mill, rout and even be fitted with moulder tooling.


    This one dates from 1950

    Time to tear it down


    Now that is a lead screw


    I dont think I will take musch notice of the wiring, why would someone get some 4 core cable and use the earth wire for one of the phases.


    I've never done one of these and was really surprised when I undid the bolts that attach the foot lever to the head and the head slid out with a wollop.



    To get the rest of the assembly out I needed to tip the casting over.


    All big bits removed

    Luckily when people do the hammerite clown paint job they dont normally prep things properly which makes it easy to remove the paint with a scraper.

    While it was on its side I thought I may as well start the prep.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Petone, NZ
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    Default

    Nice!

    Looking at the foot pedal...

    LQfoot.jpg

    The shaft the foot pedal rotates on - on my LP - is seized in place. With some heating Iíve managed to get it part way out (until my short brass drift ran out of length, and me out of puff. But itís still stuck in the machine at present, so that part of my LP frame hasnít been painted yet. Also distracted by too many projects on the go (and jobs for SWMBO).


    I'm assuming that contactor switch is a modern replacement - the"CE" on the side gives it away.

    xQSRzLm.jpg

    Was the the mounting of this switch done cleanly, or did they butcher the "Brookhirst" door to fit it?

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...

  4. #3
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    Sep 2012
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    Default

    The mounting was done ok with no big holes in the door

    Heres a pic of the first version of the LQ, this one dates from around 1910

    I have the next machine after this the LP which I will get to one day











    I had to get some more paint supplies so whilst their I treat myself to a new spray gun. Works lovely for £24.

    I got the main casting prepped and primed.


    I thought I'd give this magic stuff a go, it seems to all the rage on youtube

    This is how they came out after a nights soak

    Then a quick wire wheel, I'm quite impressed. A lot less hassle then electrolysis but quite expensive

    Some bits in the blackening solution


    Shiny handwheels

    I couldnt find a container to put these bits in so tried this

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Millmerran,QLD
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    Wallace

    Nice job you are doing and a very solid lump of gear you have there. Do you have any of the specialised cutters that were used for the spindle moulding operations? Although the catalogues refer to spindle moulding, it is not the normal cutter head seen on a table style moulder.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Port Sorell, Tasmania
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    344

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wallace1973 View Post
    The mounting was done ok with no big holes in the door


    I couldnt find a container to put these bits in so tried this
    Looking good Mark, I used a length of PVC pipe with an end cap glued on for treating shafts with evaporust.

    Tony
    You can't use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have. ~Oscar Wilde

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    Wallace

    Nice job you are doing and a very solid lump of gear you have there. Do you have any of the specialised cutters that were used for the spindle moulding operations? Although the catalogues refer to spindle moulding, it is not the normal cutter head seen on a table style moulder.

    Regards
    Paul
    The machine came with a load of tooling and clamps

  8. #7
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    Default Wadkin LP, LQ and LR.

    Quote Originally Posted by wallace1973 View Post
    ...Heres a pic of the first version of the LQ, this one dates from around 1910

    LRwallace.jpg
    Close, but no cigar . That's a Wadkin LR - big brother to the LQ.

    LRwallace2.jpg Note the LR etched into a corner of that pikkie.

    Wadkin LR.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by wallace1973 View Post
    ...I have the next machine after this the LP which I will get to one day...
    The LP is the little (but maybe older) brother to the LQ.

    Wallace has a later version with the motor mounted up high (like the LQ).

    aLP-13.jpg Wallace's version.

    Whereas my LP is an earlier model (1925) with the motor mounted down low (originally - mine's been altered).

    aLP-12.jpg Mine, as sold by Wadkin in 1925.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...

  9. #8
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    Aug 2012
    Location
    Brisbane
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    Default

    Thanks for the catalogue pictures - they are a real treat. I just recently bought an LQ a few weeks ago, so thatís a big help. Unfortunately it didnít come with any cutters or clamps. If you get the chance, can you add a photo of the table clamps.

    And nice work so far, and the heads up on the evaporust. Iíve seen a lot of U.S blogs raving about it, so nice to actually see it in action. Itís also readily available here is Aus at a local automotive store (Supercheap Auto). Iíll be trying it tomorrow. Thanks.

  10. #9
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    Vann so I suppose the LR was just a beefier version of the LP, a bit like the LS and the LU

  11. #10
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    Default Wadkin LP, LQ and LR - and LS.

    Quote Originally Posted by wallace1973 View Post
    Vann so I suppose the LR was just a beefier version of the LP, a bit like the LS and the LU
    Unfortunately, that poor quality catalogue cut is all I have on the LR. I found it somewhere on the net (probably here) some time ago.

    I had assumed it was bigger than the LQ - that in increasing size they went LP, LQ and LR - but that may not be the case. It may not be much bigger than the LP, just a lot beefier (as you say) - I see Wadkin describe it as "Heavy Type".

    I still think the LP and LR were contemporary, with the LQ coming later to replace both of them - but that's based on the styling and the longer belt drive arrangement (and the Test dates of known machines).

    Interesting that of the four LPs found so far, yours has the highest serial number - LPD 636 - suggesting that at least 532 were made *. Mine (LP 410) dates to 1925.
    The highest LQ serial number found is LQ 1138 (of 1964) - suggesting over 1034 machines were produced. The earliest found is LQ 166 (of 1938), suggesting they probably went into production about 1936-37.
    We have yet to find a single LR.

    And for comparison, the higher speed LS overhead router must have gone into production at roughly the same time as the LQ (earliest known being LSA 592 of 1939), and an amazing 4,759 machines later comes the last recorded one LS 5251 of 1979. Obviously a far better seller for Wadkin, with total production well over 5,000 machines.

    * based on Jack's info that most Wadkin models start at Serial No.105.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...

  12. #11
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    Default Wadkin LHR.

    Quote Originally Posted by wallace1973 View Post
    Vann so I suppose the LR was just a beefier version of the LP, a bit like the LS and the LU
    And if you think the LR was beefy, take a look at this mother...

    Wadkin LHR.jpg

    The pamphlet appears to date to 1960, and the machine weighs in at 90cwt (= 4.5 tonnes) - compared to 7.5cwt for the first LP (later LPs were 9cwt = ~450kg).

    I don't know anyone with one in their garage .

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...

  13. #12
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    Vann

    I am guessing that is not their bench top model. Funny thing is that without some comparison alongside you would be unable to pick the size.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  14. #13
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    May 2007
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    Vic
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    Default

    Looking like another great restoration Mark.

    The LQ is one lovely machine for some one off big milling . My one has had a ER collet chuck fitted and I can fit from small up to 19mm shank . So any milling cutters , all router bits and some big ex cnc heads with 19 mm shank is in these pictures.
    The ex cnc heads came in a bucket for $50. I took the carbide cutters off one of them and milled a slot , on the LQ, then brazed some HSS into that . The lambs tongue stopped chamfer is a 140mm diameter cutter. Not possible to run on a high speed machine . Which is what makes the LQ so good.
    The Oak columns having the chamfer done on the edge were 240 x 240 . The recessing and moulding all done on the LQ when held flat.
    I dont think the original Wadkin tooling looks all that useful if its furniture machining you would want to be doing . Some of it probably would, but I wouldn't want to be relying on finding old Wadkin stuff to get me tooled up for a job.

    Here is a video of machine running https://www.instagram.com/p/Bu1BQC4AVjb/

    Rob
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #14
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    That is very cool Rob, I cant wait till I get my LP done, I picked up a load of old tooling a while back, I think some of it is off a miller as well

  16. #15
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    This is the column the table rotates on and also the raising gear


    Somewhere in their is a tapered pin that needs removing to allow the shaft and gear to come out

    A bit aluminium bodge

    The spring that lifts the head back up.

    Mmm shiny

    The spindle assembly

    Bronze pulley, on the inside is a square hole which takes the drive to the spindle









    Now to pick the brains of the learnid, This is the main spindle which has an insert to hold a chuck. The insert is morse 4 taper and is stuck. Normally if its stuck I would just stick some big stilsons on and a long pipe and that would pop it out. Not with this though. I've tried heat with no success. I also tried making some wedges.

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