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  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Sth Gippsland Vic
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    2,965

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    Looking great Mark . The Gold looks nice and flash too . A very nice rich Gold it is . What sort of paint is it ?
    Rob

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    uk
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    The paint shop couldn't do metallic enamel mix so I pinched this from my wifes craft supplies, I will check the make, It is water based enamel and went on surprisingly well

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    uk
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    To secure the fixing for bar I drilled and tapped it.

    Followed by a bit crow poo braze

    A bit filler

    And a splash of etch primer

    The nuts to tighten the bar clamps are missing so I remembered I had some offcuts of stair rods




  5. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    uk
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    368

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    A bit more done, it was only 5 degrees so not the best weather to be spraying. Luckily this enamel is very forgiving and doesn't need perfect conditions for a decent finish. I did put the pieces under a chicken brooding lamp for a bit though.



    For the arms I got some round bar from a local fabrication place for the princely sum of 6

    My bitsa support seems to work pretty well

    This saw was missing a couple of adjustable pin that the sliding table runs on, I asked this guy to do them and he kindly agreed
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoS6ipDd-bM&t=26s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLxiO0ui2qM

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    368

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    These are the eccentric pins that hold the bearing for the sliding table. Two of them were missing so I asked that doubleboost of youtube to make a couple, which he kindly did. The one on the right is the wadkin one.

    Bearings installed

    It was also missing a couple of the pins that hold plain bearings for lateral adjustment of the slider.
    Luckily I had a couple spare that Matt Matt made for me a few years ago.

    I made some brass covers for the bearings


    This poor pk was also missing its extension for the table.

    All finished









  7. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Port Sorell, Tasmania
    Posts
    535

    Default

    Another fantastic restoration job Mark. Good to see yet another old machine brought back to life.

    Tony
    You can't use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have. ~Oscar Wilde

  8. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    65
    Posts
    2,375

    Default Blade Raise/Lower Mechanism.

    I remember wallace mentioning this, and after a bit of searching I found it...

    Quote Originally Posted by wallace1973 View Post
    ...No wonder there was a bit slop I'm sure that's supposed to be a tapered pin, funnily I've had 3 pk's with this pin broken.


    So today I took apart the blade raise/lower "gearbox" off PK 1857.

    Sure enough: the tapered pin was gone - replaced by a 5/16"/8mm roll pin. And the roll pin was munted . The brass gear wheel hub had been rotated 90 degrees and a new hole drilled for the roll pin (so the tapered pin holes were still there), but the tapered pin hole in the shaft had been drilled out to take the roll pin. So no chance of fitting a replacement taper pin.

    The roll pin extended out one side but I could push it back in with my finger. Once flush with the hub it stuck. I tapped it out with a punch and it was bent like a banana. I found a new 8mm roll pin and fitted that. Nice and tight (but I'm not sure that it's strong enough).

    Now I'm worried about my working PK - which is very tight to lower and raise the blade .
    While I was at it I cleaned out all the grease (and the red paint on the brass gear wheel washed off too ) and gave everything a coating of oil. I didn't have my camera with me and now it's too dark to take photos - maybe tomorrow.

    The moral of the story: I guess this pin is a weakness in the PK design - and needs checking from time to time.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    368

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    I think it happens when a machine has been left with the blade set in one position for a long time, and maybe ran without dust extraction. The ways get crudded up which makes the raise, lower much harder. Add in a lack of maintenance and a bit rust and it becomes seized. Then some one gives it what fettle to move it and the pin is the weak link. The machines I start with have definately been neglected a bit.

  10. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    65
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    2,375

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    ...The roll pin extended out one side but I could push it back in with my finger. Once flush with the hub it stuck. I tapped it out with a punch and it was bent like a banana...
    Okay, so some bananas are straighter than others.

    PK 94.jpg

    Here's the "gearbox" reassembled after de-greasing (lightly oiled only).

    PK 90.jpg

    Note the new roll pin.

    PK 91.jpg PK 92.jpg PK 93.jpg

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  11. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Little River
    Age
    75
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    Put another roll pin inside the first one for added strength.

  12. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    65
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    2,375

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bohdan View Post
    Put another roll pin inside the first one for added strength.
    Thanks. I wondered about that. It looks like a 5mm roll pin will fit inside the 8mm one.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  13. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    Hamilton NZ
    Age
    56
    Posts
    19

    Default nice rebuild

    A very nice rebuild.
    Sometimes they have pins that are meant to fail, so as another more expensive part does not fail.
    Used to be called sacrificial pins or shear pins, sometimes made from aluminium or mild steel.
    I don't know anything about the Wadkin PK saws, except that my late father had one in his workshop
    as well as a Wadkin planer.

    Goes to show what can be nicely rebuilt and be put back into service.

    Neil

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