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  1. #1
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    Sep 2012
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    Default Wadkin PK restoration

    Since I finished the bandsaw yesterday I thought I'd crack on and start this thing. I got a message a couple of years ago asking if I knew of any history to it. All I knew was that it was an early generation 1 machine. Oh and I wants it.
    I offered to buy it but he was not ready to sell it. But he did say if and when he would contact me. Going forward I messaged him every few months to see if it was for sale and eventually he must of got sick of me asking so he offered it. The price was high, twice as much as I knew I could buy one for elsewhere. But like I said earlier 'I wants it'.


    His place was not suitable for pallet collection so I drove to halifax and put it in my VW. I remember it well because after I'd loaded up and secured everything I had a little rest and had some food and coffee. It was then I saw a middle aged woman saunter up to my window and ask, 'do ye fancy any business luv' in a very yorkshire accent. I declined but did offer her a butty, she looked knackered.


    Anyway I digress, I've been looking forward to this one for ages.





    Do you see the 115 stamped after the PK, that is what number it is but wadkin started at 100 so my machine is the 6th machine built.





    It was built on 13th sept 1928





    It was overhauled 4 years later and it looks like the speed was changed. Can you imagine a machine nowadays being tested for 6hrs.


    The thing that floats my boat is that the PK was unveiled to the public at the 1928 trade exhibition, maybe this is my machine.























    This is the first time I've done a generation 1 and their are lots of modifications on later machines








    The ruler is etched into the table, later a chesterman ruler was inset





    These bolts are for extensions to acomodate a longer slider

















    Its had alot of work done to it at some point, it has a modern dc break and a crown guard from a much later PP





    Back in the day this is what was in use





    I cant imagine why the PK took off



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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
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    66
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    2,501

    Default Check the Maths.

    Nice to see this machine get underway.

    Thanks for all the write up from the exhibition regarding the PK, CC and maybe CJ? saws.

    Now for a quick correction of the maths...

    Quote Originally Posted by wallace1973 View Post
    ...Do you see the 115 stamped after the PK, that is what number it is but wadkin started at 100 so my machine is the 6th machine built.

    Wadkin started at 105, so this being 115 it would be the 11th PK built.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  4. #3
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    Apr 2013
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    Brisbane
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    Default

    I am looking forward to this one! This no doubt will be epic!

  5. #4
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    Default

    I made a mistake in my earlier post this machine was the 11th made and wadkins machine numbering starts at 105. Thanks to Vann the wadkin statistician.


    Wadkin added flip top oilers on later models here for the raise and lower shaft.





    I find you dont need much heat to free up stuck pins








    This has definately been taken to bits in the past. The tapered pin has been wacked in too hard. I had to drill it out.








    The grease nipple has been rubbing when tilted








    I found a broken stud which someone has attempted to drill out not so well. I wont be able to drill it out so might try the doubleboost method of welding a nut on it.





    Now this is a bit odd, this is where the gear for the tilt is attached,





    Its almost as if someone messed up the pattern for the base casting, and forgot to add a hole and a raised area that would normally be machined flat for bolt holes.








    And this part has been cobbled together, the bit where the shaft goes through is nicely bored with oil grooves inside, but there is thick steel welded on the sides for the bolt holes.



  6. #5
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    Sep 2012
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    uk
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    Default

    Ive been removing the old paint mainly at the bottom where it was really chipped, theres no point removing every bit because the filler they used is really solid.








    Followed by a load of aluminium filler





    I've done quite a few PK's and never thought to put the casting on a bench to work on.





    Wadkin would stamp parts with the machine number to keep them with the correct machine. Looks like someone picked up the wrong bit.





    This part is off an earlier version





    This poor thing has certainly been in the wars, the fence plate has been welded and re machined





    Also the blade flask has been snapped and welded back together








    A later version of the trunnion






  7. #6
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    Default

    Running low on consumables, 100 for this lot. The sanding discs will last a while though, I've only used two so far.





    Anyone explain the pattern? Is it the cooling of the cast iron





    Taking the handwheels off is just a matter of drilling the peened end and wacking with a punch





    But wadkin thought it needed to be threaded and peened





    The main casting is nearly ready for some primer





    I was contemplating using some polyester spray filler but I think it might be too cold


    The blade flask cover is very basic, wadkin changed to cast iron with a much more complicated casting then they changed to aluminium











    The brass cages look like they are supposed to be attached to the sliding table judging by corresponding holes, they werent attached , just floating around.





    The balls are kept in place by the brass being chiseled slightly





    At first I thought it was supposed to slot into the groove at the bottom, but its thicker and doesn't reach.



  8. #7
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    Default

    More filler application





    I thought I'd give the spray filler a go. This stuff is literally liquid car filler with an activator. It goes on horribly and is a nightmare to clean the gun, apparently you need acetone which I never had.
    There is nearly a litre on the these two parts, so you can imagine how thick it goes on.








    The fence plate cleaned up nice, you wouldn't think this has been broken and welded








    One strange thing is this machine was one from the first batch made and yet has a slider from a PJ but the fence says PK. I have done PK's which had a PJ fence.





    I normally take the wheels off the shaft but the tapered pin was solid so I stuck the whole thing in the lathe. to clean up.





    Cast iron is really hard to get a full on shine. It needs buffing on a mop next.





    Got some more supplies in. Someone mentioned those paint removal discs on my bandsaw thread so I thought I'd try them. I got some other ones that are like fine scotchbrite.
    I also got some steel rod for new locating pins and a box of 5 wire wheels for the silly price of 21, I normally pay 10 for one wire wheel.



  9. #8
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    Apr 2013
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    Brisbane
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    Default

    I previously bought those Coral Discs (Abrasive wheel for paint & rust removal) from China: Page Not Found - Aliexpress.com but the costs have about doubled since I bought them before COVID. I did find these mega cheap from a local market here in Brisbane (Mount Gravatt Markets) he's got all sorts of tools and disposables and even mega cheap heavy duty castor wheels.

    How do rate het spray filler? Any concerns on it's hardness once set?

  10. #9
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    Its only the third time I've used it, the first I thought I'd screwed it up because it came out the gun so horribly. If you want a really nice flat finish its great. It hardens just the same as normal car bodge. I need a bigger tip for my gun at least 2mm but I think I like it.

  11. #10
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    Default

    I've considered it myself as a means to get a super smooth surface, thanks for the nozzle tip

  12. #11
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    Default

    To get a good result with the writing its best to flood the area with primer, obviously you can get more paint on if its flat.








    And then a big dollop of water drips from your mask





    The day after, I did manage to rescue it, had to sand and fill it then sprayed again





    Top coat














    Whilst the filler was drying I started on the handles, In the lathe slow speed and used the grinder with a flapper disc then sandpaper from 120 to 800 followed by a buff with red silverline compound






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