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  1. #76
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Sydney
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    1,166

    Default

    are you committing to find it a great piece of timber to eat for it's 93rd?

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  3. #77
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia.
    Posts
    804

    Default

    Gees, hope l make it to 94 !
    Melbourne Matty.

  4. #78
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,691

    Default Motor Serial Numbers

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann
    ..I did however, clean up the English Electric tag.

    RB 113 EEtag.jpg RB 116 EEtag.jpg Tags 113 & 116.

    Note that these are off RB 113 and RB 116 (3 numbers apart) while the motors are X11330B (RB 113) and X11328B (RB 116) – (2 numbers apart)...
    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    Looking through some notes this arvo, I found the motor number for RB 109 (now deceased) from the Machinery Register at the Hutt workshops.

    Updated motor serial numbers:
    X11325B - RB 109;
    X11328B - RB 116;
    X11330B - RB 113.

    It looks like the motors weren't attached the the buzzers in any particular order.
    I've recently returned from a visit to my brother in Dunedin, and collected the motor (off RB 117) that he's been storing since 2017. It came with some steel conduit, an MEM Startex On/Off switch, and some fabric covered wiring . Also a spare rear (behind the fence) cutter guard.

    RB 117m.jpg Note a few pieces of conduit to the right of the box.

    And the tag number is X11336B.

    RB 117mtag.jpg

    Updated motor serial numbers:
    X11325B - RB 109;
    X11328B - RB 116;
    X11330B - RB 113;
    X11336B - RB 117.

    Nope, those motors certainly weren't attached the the buzzers in any particular order.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  5. #79
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,691

    Default MEM Woes – pt.1.

    While I've been procrastinating over finishing the reassembly of this buzzer, I've been working on refurbishing the switchgear. It came with MEM switchgear.

    The isolating switch is a “modern” (1960s) MEM replacement. The jury is still out regarding whether I’ll reuse it, or replace it with something older.

    RB 206.jpg

    The stop/start switch is a loverly olde MEM cast iron clad double break magnetic contactor.

    RB 207.jpg

    A “Darth Vadar” look-alike . Officially known as a: MEM ‘Auto-Memota’ Direct-on-line Contactor Starter. It’s in the 1937 catalogue I recently bought, and I feel it’s almost certainly the original contactor fitted when this 1926 machine was installed about 1929.

    I knew its push button station was damaged, needing repair or replacement.

    MEMa3.jpg MEMa4.jpg

    I bought a NOS "Auto-Memota" from the UK – just in case.

    MEM2a.jpg MEM2b.jpg

    The new contactor has a 200-250v coil. 240v is available by connecting any phase to Neutral. Unfortunately the guy who built our place wired the three phase circuits with 4-core cable – 3 phases and Earth – no Neutral .

    That wouldn’t be a problem, I would simply steal the push button station and fit it to the original contactor. Last week I finally got around to doing that.

    MEMa5.jpg

    It was then that I noticed that the “bridge” (or whatever it’s called) at the top is also damaged – and this time the broken piece is lost. That’s okay, I can swap the bridges over...

    MEMa6.jpg The bakelite "bridge" should extend forward under the screw head in the foreground.

    MEMa7.jpg Unbroken "bridge" on the NOS contactor.

    ...except the contacts are different . Note (below) the copper contact strips on the NOS contactor (left) are arched, while on the original contactor (right) they're mostly flat.

    MEMa8.jpg

    Consulting the catalogues again I see I have two different versions of the “Auto-Memota" contactor. The original one is a Series 3, while the NOS one is a Series 2 .

    Ah well. I can swap the push button station back into the NOS contactor, and swap the 250v coil for the 400v coil at the same time (at least the coils are interchangeable – I checked the catalogues).

    Meantime the cast iron case has been de-rusted and re-painted - without problems .

    MEMa9.jpg MEMa10.jpg

    Cheers, Vann.
    Last edited by Vann; 28th May 2019 at 05:36 PM. Reason: Two photos added.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  6. #80
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,691

    Default A Stand - pt.3.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    Probably the first thing I’ll need to do is to provide a stand – as Wadkin didn’t .

    When this photo was taken on 10th of May this year (edit: 2017) it was located on a wooden bench 45” wide by 30” deep. It’s most likely the stand made for it when installed in the Hillside Railway Workshops ~1929 (edit: 1926).

    RB 201.jpg

    The bench wasn’t part of the sale (I didn’t want to pay for the additional shipping charges), but when it came to finding a pallet I guess they couldn’t find one the right size, so they knocked the legs off the bench and attached the whole shebang to a slightly smaller pallet.

    At 30” deep, the bench is about 1” deeper than the buzzer, so I’m not going to gain anything significant by making a smaller bench. Therefore I’ve decided I’ll remake the bench using as much of the existing bench as I can. After all, the buzzer and the bench have been together for 88 years – no point in ending that relationship now if I don’t have to.

    RB 202.jpg RB 203.jpg

    One of the side frame members is damaged, but the two long frame members and the deck look to be salvagable. There are about eight 4” nails through each half-lap join in the frame timbers – I don’t think the half laps will survive the rebuild. So either I’ll cut off the half laps, shortening the bench by 5-6”, or I’ll use those pieces along the sides and make new long members. Or maybe I can just repair the side without dismantling it...
    I took it all apart. I salvaged both long frame members and the deck. I decided to make the hole in the deck, under the cutterblock, much larger to avoid chips building up under there.

    Making the hole larger meant two of the deck boards no longer spanned the deck, so when I made up the two new (macrocarpa) ends I cut mortises and ran an additional frame member (complete with tennons) to support the deck.

    I then moved on to the legs. I want to reproduce the angles bracing the legs at the front. The infeed end will have a horizontal member (like the original) and a top member (to increase the landing for the electrical switches). I bought some 3/8" rod for ties for the end and back.

    Note the new ends, additional frame member and larger hole for woodchips.

    Bench8.jpg Dry fitting the new legs and front angles.

    One end glued, screwed and tie rod fitted. I had some 3/8" BSW square nuts, so I cut 3/8" BSW threads on each end of the tie rods.

    Bench9.jpg Dry fitting the back - looks like I made the back tie rod too short .

    A view with the infeed end legs on.

    Bench10.jpg Nope, I made the back horizontal too long .

    It now has three legs fitted (no photo), but I've misplaced the "yea olde" slotted countersunk steel screws I'd found to hold the legs in place, so progress has stalled until I find them.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  7. #81
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,691

    Default Electrical Conduit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vann View Post
    While I've been procrastinating over finishing the reassembly of this buzzer, I've been working on refurbishing the switchgear. It came with MEM switchgear.

    The isolating switch is a “modern” (1960s) MEM replacement. The jury is still out regarding whether I’ll reuse it, or replace it with something older.

    RB 206.jpg

    The stop/start switch is a loverly olde MEM cast iron clad double break magnetic contactor.

    RB 207.jpg...
    I've now got the bench to a stage where I can consider where to run the conduit. I am, of course, going to use recycled steel conduit (I'm weird like that ). 5/8" conduit for the 3 phase and Earth wires (4 wires) to the motor. And 3/4" conduit for the two lots of 3 phase and Earth (7 wires) between isolating switch and contactor.

    The contactor was located beneath the infeed table.

    Bench13.jpg

    I'm going to locate it just a little closer to the front, for ease of access.

    Bench12.jpg

    I believe the wiring between contactor and motor ran either at the back of the bench, or underneath the bench top (most things electrical were removed when the legs were removed and the buzzer was put on a pallet). I want to push the bench hard up against a wall, so at the back isn't an option.

    I could run it underneath.

    Bench11b.jpg Option "A".

    Or along towards the rear along the top and over the back of the motor stand.

    Bench11a.jpg Option "B".

    Or between the motor and gearbox.

    Bench11c.jpg Option "C".

    I like to see the conduit, so Option "A" is not appealing. The isolating swtich has knockouts missing from the left side (for conduit to the contactor) and the top, so option "C" (which requires the conduit to enter from above) is my preferred option.

    Onwards and upwards.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  8. #82
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,691

    Default A Stand - pt.4.

    While re-assembling the deck of the bench I replaced the nails with screws from a box of NOS steel slotted csk screws - 3" x 10g. In places removing the old nails had caused additional damage so some patches were applied.

    Bench13.jpg

    Similarly some even bigger NOS steel slotted csk screws were used to tie in the diagonal beams at the front - 4 1/2" x 12g (big buggers).

    Bench15a.jpg The brace visible is temporarily clamped across the open end while moving.

    Then I added some chamfered spacers either side of the chip opening - to form a "hopper" to help direct chips into the intended chip bins below.

    Bench14.jpg

    It's now ready to lift the buzzer from the temporary bench, back onto it's original bench.

    Bench16.jpg

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  9. #83
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,691

    Default A Stand - pt.5.

    I removed the tables (to lighten it) and slid the machine across and into position on it's original bench.

    Bench16.jpg

    Next to bolt it down. I searched but couldn't find the bolts. Then I remebered that at least one was missing, one was too short, and one was a coach screw.

    I decided to make new studs. Out with some newly acquired 1/2" rod and the BSW dies.

    Bench17.jpg

    I also found eight suitable heavy washers and seven square nuts (gotta keep up that vintage look). The eighth nut would possibly foul the chip bin below the deck, so I made one stud shorter and made a recess for the washer and nut. A hex nut would require a smaller diameter recess and could be more easily tightened with a socket.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  10. #84
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,691

    Default A Stand - pt.6.

    Finally, the buzzer is bolted down on its permanent stand. A picture of the top end of a stud with period square nut.

    RB 98.jpg Already covered in dust (not from this machine ).

    And a view from the underside showing the bottom end of three studs (including the recessed nut and washer).

    RB 99.jpg I may recess deeper if required.

    While this has been going on, I've also had another test fit of the conduit (and adjusted some lengths), and I've been refurbishing the MEM isolating switch.

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  11. #85
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,691

    Default Electrics and Conduit.

    I understand why sparkies like modern PVC conduit.

    I've test fitted the steel conduit several times. Each time I need to shorten (or lengthen) a piece it's out with the dies in order to cut some more thread. Of course each time I grip it in the vice, tight enough to cut threads, the paint gets damaged and it's another two or three days before the piece is repainted. I could never afford to pay a sparkie to take that long to do the conduit (assuming I could find a sparkie who knows how).

    Anyway, it's almost done. Today I reassembled the isolating switch, fitted the last piece of conduit, and started running wires.

    RB 119.jpg

    RB 120.jpg

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  12. #86
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,691

    Default Electrics and Conduit - pt.2.

    A bit more done:
    - conduit saddles fitted;
    - all wires run through to contactor;
    - conduit elbow cover fitted;
    - contactor fully wired (except Earth);
    - isolating switch partially wired in;
    - plug, lead and gland attached to isolating switch (still to be wired in);
    - tools and spare parts tidied away.

    RB 121.jpg

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

  13. #87
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,491

    Default

    Slowly making progress!
    For a moment there I thought you had scored your self an Auto Memota bottle opener and added it to the bench!

  14. #88
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Petone, NZ
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,691

    Default Electrics and Conduit - pt.3.

    I finally wired in the lead and plug, and connected the remaining Earth leads.

    Yesterday I unplugged two other machines so I could run a lead to this buzzer. I plugged it in and tested the circuit. The contactor clicked in nicely when the "On' button was pushed (the motor is not the one I intend to fit to this machine so is not wired in).

    RB 122.jpg

    I cycled the contactor ~a dozen times to be sure (using a stick to push the buttons as I don't like my fingers that close to exposed terminals ).

    It's now electrically all complete up to (but excluding) the motor. All covers, including the elbow covers, are now fitted and I also added the little green "MEM" labels (the grey isolating switch should actually have the later red "MEM" label, but I don't have the necessary artwork).

    RB 123.jpg

    Next job is to complete reassembly of the "Ideal" ("Surty" clone) blade guard. Then there's the original motor to reassemble (and I'm having problems... ).

    Cheers, Vann.
    Gatherer of rusty planes tools...
    Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club .

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