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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Kingston TAS
    Posts
    38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chief Tiff View Post
    Most of my "plans" are usually of the back-of-a-fag-packet quick sketch with rough measurements, I keep a large children's drawing book on my bench for this.

    However; at school in the UK I studied Geometric & Technical drawing. I still have my drawing board and tee-square that I started using at the age of 13 and these are what I pull out when I properly need to design stuff. With every dimension to scale it provides me with an accurate cutting list and double checks the initial back-of-fag-packet calculated dimensions!

    I usually first draw it to scale as an isometric projection to see how it looks and to make sure the design is as requested; then I do a proper set of 1st angle projection technical drawings including whatever joinery methods I'm using. Following the 7 P's principle in this way massively reduces the opportunities for Mr Cock-Up to pay a visit. Reduces...
    So I am not the only one with my Grade 7 TD board and tee square hanging on the wall of the shed

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Mt Crosby, Brisbane
    Posts
    2,368

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    Mine is in the back room of the house.

    I learned autocad in the late 80's hated it. Slow and frustrating. In 05 I got a job as a design draftsman using NX. Within a few months I could build a model so much faster than I could draw, and it allowed me to check every clearance. No more calculations.

    So that's how I do it now and if I need a drawing the modelling packages allow those to be built fast.

    More recently I've been using the free autodesk package fusion 360, but I haven't fired it up in months as I'm busy doing other things.

    The trick with modelling packages is you use them like you were making something for real. You create a primitive (say a block) then cut bits off it and stick bits on until it's the right shape. Make the next part then make an assembly and stick them all together. I could model up a table in about 10 minutes and a chair in maybe 20. You can view every fit and correct mistakes instantly, try pretty things like flutes and see how they look.

    But I still have my drafting gear for when that solar flare hits
    I'm just a startled bunny in the headlights of life. L.J. Young.
    We live in a free country. We have freedom of choice. You can choose to agree with me, or you can choose to be wrong.
    Wait! No one told you your government was a sitcom?

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    619

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    Quote Originally Posted by notevensquare View Post
    So I am not the only one with my Grade 7 TD board and tee square hanging on the wall of the shed
    I usually rough out designs on scraps of paper. I do use CAD (Fusion360) for some things, but only when its complex or I want an accurate idea of parts placement.

    I have often pondered if the "3D Drawing Board" would be worth-while replacement for a TD board - Its quite a cleaver system. (If you can't be bothered watching the whole thing, check out the first 60 seconds & the section from about 3:35 to 3:45 to get an idea on its functions)


    The price has come WAY down over the years.
    3D Drawing Board | Designability Group

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    80

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    I start on scrap paper, then go to an A3 graph paper pad.
    For smaller drawings I use half a page at a time.

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    30
    Posts
    5,168

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    I still draw by hand as well, for rough plans it's just easier than CAD

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Seaford, Vic
    Posts
    79

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    My boat builder still draws by hand - and he can't use a ruler either - its enormously frustrating because it means that we often aren't quite sure what we are going to get... other than a $100,000+ boat

  8. #22
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Vic
    Posts
    2,723

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    Yeah I draw everything on the drawing board . Email pictures to clients and go from there .
    Clients like the paper and pencil drawings. Here's a few I did last week .

    Some bedside tables . I had to draw these about six times to get to where the decorator was happy . It started with the left one and ended with the right. They don't take long to do.

    I don't need to do perspective drawings at all. I was shown at trade school but find its only of use when drawing a room with furniture placed in the room . Something I never need to do . Face side and Plan view is all that's needed mostly, and sometimes detailed internal construction is needed for me not the client.

    IMG_4208.JPGIMG_4285.JPG

    I'm building a tower scaffold atm. So I can build my dust extraction . Ive got to hang pipes off a roof 4.7 meters off the ground. I Did lots of rough sketches on scrap at the computer then went to the drawing board. Should have it assembled today I hope. Its roughly 2.4 x 1.640 x 4.2 high . I changed some dimensions as I was making it .
    IMG_4244.JPG

    Once I know whats being made exactly a cutting list is made and the build happens from that .

    Drawing on computer or paper , cutting list . Double checking . Its the only way to go to avoid mistakes .

    Rob

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Townsville. Tropical Nth Qld.
    Posts
    794

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    I don't own a computer so the tablet is quite limiting so it's CAD for me, that's Cardboard Aided Drawing. Loved tech drawing at high school and have never changed.
    Rgds,
    Crocy.

  10. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Leopold, Victoria
    Age
    61
    Posts
    3,528

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    I also enjoyed Tech Drawing when at school and did very well at it. My teacher was disappointed when I got an apprenticeship and left before the end of that year.
    Since then I have learnt how to use Acad for 2D and then moved on to Solidworks and now trying to learn Fusion 360 as one of my versions of Solidworks has decided to stop working (maybe mr Microsoft caught up with me). All of these have been self taught as I just like being able to produce something in print that matches the accuracy that I try to achieve when making it. I often design up a project for my wood club for members to make and it's good to be able to show them a 3d model on paper as they can visualise the end product better and I am not good at hand sketching. When drawing on the computer, changes are easily done without making a mess on paper rubbing out etc. I normally just jot down a bit of a sketch on paper and then go to the computer at night and draw it up.
    Having said that, I do admire people who can produce a good conceptual sketch on paper, but that's not me.
    Cheers,
    Dallas

  11. #25
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Powell, TN
    Age
    68
    Posts
    5

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    My circumstances as well - work with what you’ve got and plan accordingly. I love graph paper for all planning, including the two-story single rooms addition ongoing now. Great for determining materials lists from the home center. Most woodworking is ‘measure as we go’ with a reference to book plans for direction.

    I think as long as you do SOME sort of planning your success rate will be higher. I do nothing without a plan of some sort...

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