Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 345678910 LastLast
Results 106 to 120 of 144
  1. #106
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    77
    Posts
    11,785

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldgreybeard View Post
    ..... my question is:
    Is there any practical reason to search for a level of precision greater than the "tried and proven" - draw a perpendicular line to an edge, flip the square and check that the line is still perpendicular to the edge? If a difference cannot be seen by the eye, then is it not acceptable to consider that it is "close enough" and proceed to the next task? Job done ......
    Bob, this sort of discussion flares up on a regular basis. I'm in your camp, some of the levels of "accuracy" quoted for various (expensive) tools are plainly absurd for the purposes of woodworking. The resolving power of the average unaided human eye is generally quoted as 0.2mm (~.008"). Some people can do better than that, but the majority of more senior citizens do much worse.

    The errors incurred in careful setting out with decent tools should be way smaller than the sharpest eye could resolve. And yep, I agree strongly with your sentiments - the errors introduced by most of us with hand tools is far greater than any errors due to a square being some infinitesmal fraction of a degree out of 'square'. The problem is that Murphy's law decrees that ALL errors be additive, even though the law of averages says as many should be subtractive as additive.


    Cheers,
    IW

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #107
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    621

    Default

    The carpenter that I served most of my apprenticeship under would say “the harder you try for perfect, the closer you’ll get”. I’m not sorry that this has stuck with me for almost fifty years but sometimes it makes a project harder than it could be.

  4. #108
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Dandenong Ranges
    Posts
    1,729

    Default

    Hi P. One of my boss's favourite sayings was "it's usually just as easy to build it right as it is to build it wrong"

  5. #109
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    621

    Default

    T'was pretty warm here today and I had some yard duties to take care of before I could touch the brass, so before I started the mower I turned the air on in the shed and did a stocktake of the beer fridge. I got one of the sides marked and roughed out. I wasn't sure how I would go about cutting the hole, but with the jigsaw held in the vice and a lot of back and forward, I got there. Lucky the vice was in front of the A/C because the rest of the shed wasn't as comfy.
    P1010001.jpg P1010007.jpg P1010008.jpg

  6. #110
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6,739

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Picko View Post
    T'was pretty warm here today and I had some yard duties to take care of before I could touch the brass, so before I started the mower I turned the air on in the shed and did a stocktake of the beer fridge. I got one of the sides marked and roughed out. I wasn't sure how I would go about cutting the hole, but with the jigsaw held in the vice and a lot of back and forward, I got there. Lucky the vice was in front of the A/C because the rest of the shed wasn't as comfy.
    P1010001.jpg P1010007.jpg P1010008.jpg

    Picko,

    I admire a man who is well organised has priorities an has a clear mission,
    An as a bonus you cut some of your brass up as well, looking good.

    Cheers Matt.

  7. #111
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Isn't there some work in this gold stuff! I finally got both sides ready to go. I was thinking about how to hold everything in place while I drilled the rivet holes and realised it was likely that it would all turn to crap. With this in mind, and a beer in hand, I came up with a plan. I glued it all up with P/U adhesive which allowed me to adjust things a little as I clamped it all up. Yes, I did remember to put the cap pivot in, and now all I have to worry about is that nothing moves as the glue sets. I might need to have a couple of stubbies while I watch it.
    PB270001.jpg

  8. #112
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    77
    Posts
    11,785

    Default

    Good lateral thinking, Picko. I tack the bits together with solder to hold them for drilling, and to stick those little bits beside the lower bed to the core, where it's too narrow for rivets. I guess you could silver-solder brass to cast iron, but glue might hold almost as well there- at least in the short term?

    So, all that remains is drilling lots of holes & peening lots of rivets....
    IW

  9. #113
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6,739

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Picko View Post
    Isn't there some work in this gold stuff! I finally got both sides ready to go. I was thinking about how to hold everything in place while I drilled the rivet holes and realised it was likely that it would all turn to crap. With this in mind, and a beer in hand, I came up with a plan. I glued it all up with P/U adhesive which allowed me to adjust things a little as I clamped it all up. Yes, I did remember to put the cap pivot in, and now all I have to worry about is that nothing moves as the glue sets. I might need to have a couple of stubbies while I watch it.
    PB270001.jpg
    Picko,
    From weíre Iím sitting that looks like a big hurdle done.
    Good idea with the glue too, crossing my toes,nothing moves during the drilling.

    Cheers Matt.

  10. #114
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Bigger hurdle cleared tonight Matt. The drilling and riveting is complete. It all went surprisingly smoothly in fact.
    PB280001.jpg

    I got one side cleaned up too.

    PB280002.jpg

    I'm pleased with how it's looking now.

  11. #115
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Lawrencetown, NS, Canada
    Posts
    586

    Default

    Wow great job. The colour contrast and shape are very pleasing. You should be just about ready to make savings!

  12. #116
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6,739

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Picko View Post
    Bigger hurdle cleared tonight Matt. The drilling and riveting is complete. It all went surprisingly smoothly in fact.
    PB280001.jpg

    I got one side cleaned up too.

    PB280002.jpg

    I'm pleased with how it's looking now.
    Picko,
    Thatís looking pretty impressive,
    You must be on the home straight by now.
    Have you finished your blade yet?

    Cheers Matt.

  13. #117
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Yeah, I can see the light at the end of the tunnel now - could even take a shaving this evening Sheets. The blade is finished Matt and just needs sharpening. There will still need to be be some time spent taking off sharp edges etc. to make it feel nice in the hand. It feels good in the hand weight-wise and I just put it on the kitchen scales, it's a chunky 836g!
    Thanks for the feedback.

  14. #118
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Dandenong Ranges
    Posts
    1,729

    Default

    Hi P. Looks lovely. I agree with others about the shape. And extra points for the brass lined hole in the "knob". Is that to hang the plane on a nail? Sorry, only being cheeky!

  15. #119
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Ash View Post
    Is that to hang the plane on a nail?
    That's pretty much it MA . I actually have, until now, an undisclosed trick up my trouser leg. I thought that if, in use the plane is difficult to hold, I could have a removeable knob that could be utilised left or right handed.



    We'll see.

  16. #120
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    77
    Posts
    11,785

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Picko View Post
    .... I actually have, until now, an undisclosed trick up my trouser leg. I thought that if, in use the plane is difficult to hold, I could have a removeable knob that could be utilised left or right handed.....
    That's a good plan, Picko, I'd award you extra points but Veritas beat you to a variable front knob by a year or three..

    Shoulder planes can certainly be a bit awkward when working against a high tenon. I usually push the plane against the tenon with my left hand & provide the power for the cut using a sort of delicate & not-too-secure finger hold of the wedge with my right hand. You find yourself watching about 5 things at once, not he least being where your knuckles are. I can see your knob coming in mighty handy at times. Weight is definitely an advantage with these things, the heavier they are, the better they ride when cutting across the grain.

    My 1 1/4 inch SP weighs in at 2.5Kg & my 3/4 at 967g., so yours is not obese.....

    Cheers,
    IW

Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 345678910 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Challenge 2020-2021 Sheets
    By Sheets in forum PLANE CHALLENGE 2020-21
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: 14th December 2020, 09:22 AM
  2. challenge 2020 - 2021. banjopicks
    By banjopicks in forum PLANE CHALLENGE 2020-21
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 22nd October 2020, 11:16 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •