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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Lawrencetown, NS, Canada
    Posts
    586

    Default

    Wow, congratulations! The fit and finish are just outstanding. That's work you can be proud of for sure (and it planes so nicely, too).

    Steve

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Dandenong Ranges
    Posts
    1,824

    Default

    Outstanding!!

  4. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Millmerran,QLD
    Age
    73
    Posts
    11,025

    Default

    Brad

    Superb build and following true to your Forum name with choice of timber, not that I would have expected anything else having some knowledge of your stash of the species.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  5. #34
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    801

    Default

    Here is my entry. An infill scraper plane nicknamed the T2012.



    The plane is inspired by the Stanley 112 scraper plane. This is my interpretation how an infill scraper plane with same functionality as the 112 would look like.

    The body is a dovetail construction with Chinese Elm as infill. Length 7.5” and weighs 1.843kg.



    Most challenging part beside the general for making dovetailed infill planes with rounded sides and lot of firsts for me was the frog construction and implementation of the angle adjustment mechanism.





    The frog is made from a 10mm steel back where the brackets for the lever cap were dovetailed in and further held by a cross pin, which also functions as the pivot axle for the connection to the adjustment bolt. The handle of the plane is a closed one and the bolt goes right through it with the adjustment nut inside of the hand hole. The hand hole was shaped and sized so that the adjustment bolt does not interfere with the hand and not causing scraped knuckles.

    The closed handle does not allow easily for having 2 adjustment nuts like on the Stanley 112. Therefore, a spring is used on the other side to give tension and a tensioning nut is included to adjust the pretension of the spring. During operation the forces on the blade are pulling the frog forward and the adjustment nut is fixing the angle of the blade reliably. This design allows for adjustment with one finger, like on the bench planes.

    The plane is with 7 ˝” a bit shorter than the 112 with same width for the 2 7/8” blade. To give the plane a more pleasing look I also rounded the sides of the plane like for the 112. There is not much space in front for a good hold alone. That's due to the short length of the plane. However, by placing the thumb of my left hand behind the blade and frog I achieve very good control of the plane and a comfortable hold.



    The plane produces good shavings (foto below). Left to right: Pine, Chinese Elm, reddish hardwood of unknown species.



    I thank for the opportunity and great experience of this challenge. It has certainly accelerated my development of new skills.



    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  6. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6,928

    Default Plane Complete, Ready for Judging

    Cklett,
    [emoji120][emoji120][emoji120][emoji120][emoji120]
    Awesome work Sir, the way you guys are going with your builds, us strugglers will be out of the race in no time.
    A really ambitious build that you have done brilliantly with.

    Cheers Matt.

  7. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Millmerran,QLD
    Age
    73
    Posts
    11,025

    Default

    CK

    Excellent. Looks to be just the job for those cranky grained Aussie timbers.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Millmerran,QLD
    Age
    73
    Posts
    11,025

    Default

    Well, here goes. I present for consideration "The Anti-Body," which is my version of a Trying plane. Description as follows.

    "I aimed to build a low angle bevel up plane using scrap and recycled materials. Materials included mild steel (galvanised channel section), high carbon steel for the blades (vehicle leaf springs), stainless steel for the lever cap and small quantities of brass, brass alloy, titanium and Hairy/Bull Oak from the Allocasuarina species. Five blades were made. Two 11mm thick and three 6mm thick. Blades were sharpened at 25°, 30°, 35° & 40°. The steeper secondary bevels are intended to combat more difficult timbers. The pine shavings exhibited are only with the 30° blade.

    The enclosed handle presented a challenge in that the adjuster was difficult to reach. This was solved by creating a significant depression just ahead of the handle. It still helps if you have hands the size of a twelve year old child. As this tool can be used as a shooting plane there is a handle for this purpose, which can be mounted either side of the body. As blade removal requires the cap iron to be removed, there is a dedicated screwdriver for this (made from a broken twist bit). Potentially the plane can be used for many purposes with blade exchange taking under five minutes. The scrub blade has a smaller brass mouth for greater clearance. Length 462mm, Width 75mm (blade 61mm)and weight 3.64Kg."


    P1070513 (Medium).JPGP1070514 (Medium).JPGP1070509.jpgP1070510.jpgP1070517 (Medium).JPGP1070516 (Medium).JPGP1070496 - Copy (Medium).JPGP1070497 - Copy (Medium).JPGP1070499 (Medium).JPGP1070502 (Medium).JPG

    Regards
    Paul

    PS: I couldn't find a suitable table cloth or tea towel so the backdrop is a Marcella quilt. I hope this is acceptable in the context of making do with what you have got.
    Last edited by Bushmiller; 25th April 2021 at 06:52 PM. Reason: missed a -ve in the PS
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  9. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Adelaide Hills, South Australia
    Posts
    4,291

    Default

    Ah, a post-armageddon plane! And, no less elegant for it, Paul.

    The name 'Dreadnought' did also come to mind when looking at it, perhaps prompted more by today's date than any real resemblance, although that lineup of heavy duty blades does resonate with that descriptor.
    Stay sharp and stay safe!

    Neil



  10. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6,928

    Default

    Paul,
    That table cloth is beautiful I’ve never seen something so beautiful in my life.

    An the Anti body, is even more beautiful, ok I’m laying it on slightly thick.

    Fantastic build Paul, love the concept.

    Cheers Matt.

  11. #40
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    801

    Default

    Welcome on the other side of the finish line. Another fantastic build!


    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  12. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Lawrencetown, NS, Canada
    Posts
    586

    Default

    Paul,

    I have to say that is very impressive - not just the size, but every aspect of it. Just superb! And the pristine white quilt is most point-worthy.
    Any species of wood you can't flatten with the blades you just need to leave the Anti Body resting atop and it will surely end up flat just the same .

    Well done!

    Steve

  13. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Adelaide - outer south
    Age
    67
    Posts
    932

    Default

    Presenting “The Laminator”, a laminated timber bodied skew plane for shooting.

    The lamination idea is for 3 reasons -
    - easier to cut out the internal cavity accurately
    - could use smaller pieces of timber
    - easier to work out the geometry for the skewed blade. Various sketches and a mock up just did my head in on this aspect. With the laminated body the blade could be set straight in the body blank but end up skewed 20 degrees by trimming the blank at that angle.

    Timber for the body, wedge and handle is blackwood. The adjuster is pear.

    Two pairs of laminations were glued up and half of the internal cavity cut in each. These were then glued up with the rest of the laminations.
    04 Cavity [800x600].jpg 05 Lamination glue up[800x600].JPG


    This assembly was then trimmed at 20 degrees.
    06 Sides trimmed [800x600].JPG

    A handle was shaped to fit my hand for comfort and control then attached to the fully trimmed body by stainless screws into threaded inserts.
    07 Handle attachment[800x600].jpg 08 Handle fit [800x600].jpg

    Finish is boiled linseed oil.
    14 Oiled 3.JPG 15 Oiled 4.JPG 16 Oiled with adjuster [800x600].JPG

    Shaving from pine.
    10 Pine shaving.JPG

    Pine end grain after shooting.
    11 Pine end grain.JPG
    Cheers, Bob the labrat

    Measure once and.... the phone rings!

  14. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6,928

    Default

    Labr,
    The “laminator” is fantastic, I love the idea and concept, being a late runner, you have certainly come up through the pack.
    An possibly, I haven’t confirmed but our first end grave shavings.
    The Hot Dog style handle is very cool too.

    Cheers Matt.

  15. #44
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Port Sorell, Tasmania
    Posts
    592

    Default Tony A's Krenov smoother

    My current smoothing planes consist of a mediocre Stanley #3 & #4. I would like a couple more options for taming difficult timber but before embarking on a high angle coffin smoother build, I am having a bit of a play around with bed angles using a simple design and basic materials. I settled on 55 degrees for this plane, 10 degrees steeper than the Stanleys

    After finishing this plane, I can say that that a Krenov smoother is simple to build and is capable of producing good results. But I suspect not quite as good as a nice metal bodied coffin infill smoother. (call that plane lust)
    It had no trouble making pine shavings
    IMG_6689.jpg

    and was able to take some fine cuts on a piece of cranky blackwood
    IMG_6690.jpg


    The plane took about two days to build and that includes more than a bit of dithering. Its designed around a Hock blade with chip breaker and the wood, E. obliqua, has proved to be quite stable with no detectable movement.


    The trickiest part of the build was opening the mouth. After quite a bit of cautious filing I was able to get it to a tight fit for a 0.5mm feeler gauge. I’m well pleased with the final result.


    Finished with BLO, because I like the look and feel.
    IMG_6697.jpg
    IMG_6698.jpg
    You can't use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have. ~Oscar Wilde

  16. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bundaberg
    Age
    54
    Posts
    3,384

    Default

    A beautiful piece, be very proud!

    Did you decide on a name?
    Nothing succeeds like a budgie without a beak.

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