Page 10 of 11 FirstFirst ... 567891011 LastLast
Results 136 to 150 of 156
  1. #136
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    76
    Posts
    11,271

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    ... I had meant to comment on your infill. I can't remember what it is called: "Over stuffing?" That is so much more difficult to achieve well and you seem to be able to bash them out time after time with consistency. I don't think anybody in the challenge has attempted this yet and time is running out for this skill..
    Yes, the Brits call it "over-stuffing", Paul, a term borrowed from upholstered furniture. Funny, when I first read of an armchair being described as "over-stuffed", back in my youth, I thought it was a derogatory term indicating the chair was too full of padding to be comfortable...

    You are spot on with your suggestion it's more difficult to over-stuff than keep the woodwork flush with the insides! I'd like to let you think I just bash 'em out nonchalantly, but honesty compels me to admit it's one of the more difficult parts of the build. The fit has to be very close as even tiny gaps between metal & wood stand out like the proverbial dogs' bits. I'm getting better at it, it's really just a matter of accurate layout & working ultra-carefully to your lines, but with these darned curved sides, the stuffing won't fit 'til it fits. When you attempt a trial fit, the inside is obscured & you can't see where it needs a bit more pared away. The way I find them is by pressing the wood down carefully over where it needs to be, then looking for any scraped or burnished areas indicating the high spots. With a few earlier ones, I was too impatient & pared wood away from the wrong places & ended up having to start over! Making a mock-up from scrap before you start chopping up a chunk of valuable wood is a very good move & helps you to iron out the potential pitfalls.

    I've followed the "challenge" builds pretty closely & have noticed two challengers have overstuffed their front buns, but not the rear wood. The front bun is usually a bit easier to do (well it's smaller, so less wood to pare ) so it's a good place to start if you want to try the technique. Both the buns I've noticed are very neatly done, so Brownie points will be accordingly awarded, no doubt.

    BTW, I don't recall seeing other than smoother-sized planes over-stuffed on oldies, all of the old panel planes & jointers I've seen were "understuffed", if that's a term. There may well be modern makers who've done it, & I dips me lid to 'em, cos all that extra joint along the sides would add to the difficulty of getting the fit required!

    On the subject of future pain - I'm not sure if & when I will get over my current shoulder problems, I can't even get a satisfactory diagnosis, let alone a suggested cure, so if there are any more planes coming out of my shed in the short to medium-long term, they will most likely be very small ones! Perhaps I should bite the bullet & invest in a good linisher (& spend the next year learning how to use without doing more damage than good... )
    Cheers,
    IW

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #137
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Millmerran,QLD
    Age
    72
    Posts
    10,111

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post

    On the subject of future pain - I'm not sure if & when I will get over my current shoulder problems, I can't even get a satisfactory diagnosis, let alone a suggested cure, so if there are any more planes coming out of my shed in the short to medium-long term, they will most likely be very small ones! Perhaps I should bite the bullet & invest in a good linisher (& spend the next year learning how to use without doing more damage than good... )
    Cheers,
    Ian

    I am not completely convinced that the linisher is the best machine for flattening. The platten is not good enough for the level of accuracy we want. They are good for quick removal of material but it will not be flat. I have used the machine at work, which is a medium level industrial version, not the same as, but similar to this from Hare and Forbes.

    H & F Linisher.jpg

    It is 415V 3HP and will set you back $1309. Really a surface grinder is what we want and they, for a small one, start at a little over $4000! Even there, the sole would have to be flattened before it is assembled to the sides.



    At least you would not have to use that wretched SS material as the clamping relies on magnetism.



    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  4. #138
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    near Mackay
    Age
    58
    Posts
    4,511

    Default

    Thanks for another interesting and informative write up Ian.
    One day when I have a bit more spare time up my sleeve, I hope to make some more planes, your builds certainly provide the inspiration.
    ​Brad.

  5. #139
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    76
    Posts
    11,271

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    .... I am not completely convinced that the linisher is the best machine for flattening. The platten is not good enough for the level of accuracy we want. They are good for quick removal of material but it will not be flat.... l
    Paul, I was not thinking of using a linisher for sole flattening, I realise it would never get me anything like what I'd accept as a usable sole (although Stanley & others now seem to think so!). I was just thinking of ways to make the initial clean-up a little less strenuous. Apart from cutting out & filing the mouth & blade bevel, that's the part that involves most effort. Preparing the sole & sides doesn't take that long now I'm well practised at it. Cleaning up after the peening always sends me into avoidance mode, I find all sorts of other minor things to do to avoid it as long as I can. On a big plane, 300mm long or more, it is quite a chore, & anything that would reduce the drudgery is welcome!

    Oddly, I enjoy filing the lever cap. It's not just that brass is a lot easier to file (as long as the files are sharp & not worn), it's much more satisfying seeing a nice shape emerge from what began as a lifeless ump of brass. Cleaning up the dovetails & pins is just pure tedium...

    Cheers
    IW

  6. #140
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Millmerran,QLD
    Age
    72
    Posts
    10,111

    Default

    Ian

    I misunderstood what you intended to do. I think you would have to use a very fine belt for your purpose. The linishing belts are often quite coarse. I just checked one of the Forum sponsors Smith and Arrow and they do a belt from 240g to 3000g in a mixed box. Could be the go.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  7. #141
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Not far enough away from Melbourne
    Posts
    4,089

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    Really a surface grinder is what we want and they, for a small one, start at a little over $4000! Even there, the sole would have to be flattened before it is assembled to the sides.
    There's always this one: Strap on Surface Grinder Attachment - Artisan Supplies

    But you need a $3000 2" x 72" belt grinder to attach it to. I find I use my belt grinder a lot (it's only a 2 x 48 and I would have bought a different one if i knew then what I know now). I bought it for knife making but I use it for much more than that. It's great for sharpening chisels and plane blades with the jig I made using the body of the Veritas MK 11 sharpening jig, as shown in my plane build thread. Best pencil sharpener ever.
    We should not judge people by their peak of excellence; but by the distance they have traveled from the point where they started.

    Henry Ward Beecher

  8. #142
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    76
    Posts
    11,271

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    ...I misunderstood what you intended to do. I think you would have to use a very fine belt for your purpose. The linishing belts are often quite coarse....
    Actually Paul, I would hesitate to use any belt finer than 120 for what I had in mind, and 80 would be motr likely what I'd choose. I only want to knock the bulk of the spare material off, so I would stop before marking the sides. It would simply be a mechanised version of what I do now, which is to use a very coarse file (equivalent to maybe 40 grit paper) and switch to finer files & finer papers progressively to reach the finish point.

    People tend to choose finer grits for grinding than they should - I certainly did at first. Finer grits are not for bulk removal, they clog quicker & cause way too much heating. Your average grey grinding wheel is 60 grit and even these need constant cleaning to keep cutting cleanly...

    Cheers,
    IW

  9. #143
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6,394

    Default

    DEATH CLOCK

    14 days, you have only 14 days left!!!!!


    Thatís only 336 hours remaining, what are you doing.
    Get a move on(Yes Iím included).

    Come on get going

    Omg panic panic panic.
    Judges like red wine just saying.

    Panic panic.
    If youíre unsure what Iím blabbing on about,
    Nothing for you too see hear, move on.


    Have a lovely day Bob an Matt.[emoji7][emoji7]

  10. #144
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    near Mackay
    Age
    58
    Posts
    4,511

    Default

    Wasnít sure where to post this, so Iíll put it here.
    Bruce Neville, in the UK, has released this book, heís saying itís the first of itís kind, I think our IanW might have beaten him to that title, but anyway here is a link to his plane making book. I havenít read it, and wonít be buying it. Just posting for your interest.
    https://l.instagram.com/?u=https%3A%...YeOBwUcP5w&s=1
    ​Brad.

  11. #145
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Millmerran,QLD
    Age
    72
    Posts
    10,111

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ironwood View Post
    Wasnít sure where to post this, so Iíll put it here.
    Bruce Neville, in the UK, has released this book, heís saying itís the first of itís kind, I think our IanW might have beaten him to that title, but anyway here is a link to his plane making book. I havenít read it, and wonít be buying it. Just posting for your interest.
    https://l.instagram.com/?u=https%3A%...YeOBwUcP5w&s=1
    Brad

    £50. How much did we pay for Ian's working notes? Oh yes, that's right, he donated it to Forum members on request. Our "Benevolent Moderator!"



    Much appreciated Ian.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  12. #146
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    76
    Posts
    11,271

    Default

    Good spotting Brad. By the looks of the plane on the cover, the author seems to have a fair idea of what he's about, so I expect it'll be a good guide, but fifty quid for a paperback book?! I guess this old phart is waaay out of date & that's the going rate for a small print-run book these days.

    I suspect it will be oriented towards Brits & Continentals who can buy a much wider range of raw materials more easily than we can down here. What actually got me started writing my "manual" was wanting to help save other people time finding & selecting material & tools based on what's fairly easy to get hold of locally. When I first thought about making a plane (last millenium!) I had no idea where to go to get the brass & steel, and less idea about the different brass alloys & what they are good for, so I spent a lot of time chasing up information. With limited success I might add, the interweb was barely underway at the time and there was certainly not as much stuff as there is now, thanks to forums & u-tube etc. If my 'manual' only helps people sort out where to start it will have achieved what I set out to do. Like my plane-making, once I started it sorta took off & became a much bigger thing than I'd intended. I probably tried to cover too much in the end.

    Several people have suggested turning it into a "proper" book, but that'd be a whole lot more work, I'd need to improve many of the pics & spend a lot of time editing & expanding some of it. So I've decided to leave it as a free-to-air thing & hope those who have it find some use in it....

    Cheers,
    Ian
    IW

  13. #147
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bundaberg
    Age
    52
    Posts
    3,046

    Default

    Fair go to the bloke; heís seen a gap in the market and a publisher has thrown in a bid but Bruceís infill looksÖ well, a bit too nasty to be something to aspire to make at that price. The lever cap boss and its mating screw stick out way too far; whatís with the weird knob thing on the blade and the front bun looks like itís trying to avoid being seen in the company of the sidesÖ.

    Iíll stick with dreaming that one day I too can design and execute an object díart worthy of sitting next to one of Ianís.
    Nothing succeeds like a budgie without a beak.

  14. #148
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane (western suburbs)
    Age
    76
    Posts
    11,271

    Default

    Awww, you're a bit tough on the poor chap Chief - it doesn't look that bad to my eyes. The side curves are a bit tentative would be my main criticism, he could've made them more explicit. Maybe you're swayed by the wan-looking wood? I presume it's box, which seems to be very popular with plane-making Brits, probably because Bill Carter always talks it up. Somehow, pale woods just don't look right to me, against the brass, Dark woods look way better, I reckon.

    Done.jpg Horn & grip mod b.jpg

    Anyway, if I happened to stumble on a remaindered copy or something I'd certainly like to have a read, the pic on the front shows him taking the waste out of the D/Ts by a method that looks a bit unusual to me - I'd like to know more...

    Cheers,
    IW

  15. #149
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bundaberg
    Age
    52
    Posts
    3,046

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IanW View Post
    Anyway, if I happened to stumble on a remaindered copy or something I'd certainly like to have a read, the pic on the front shows him taking the waste out of the D/Ts by a method that looks a bit unusual to me - I'd like to know moreÖ
    Iím pretty sure in that picture heís not cutting but using a tapered punch to peen the corners of the dovetail.

    He has a website showing off several of his handmade planes; some are ok looking (the 15Ē panel plane for one) but there are a couple that I think would be rather uncomfortable to use. He doesnít seem to like cap irons very much either. He also has his own design of removable brass lever cap; Iím sure Iíve seen something like it before somewhereÖ.
    Nothing succeeds like a budgie without a beak.

  16. #150
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    near Mackay
    Age
    58
    Posts
    4,511

    Default

    I have been watching his posts on Instagram for a while now, his dovetails look a bit neater these days, back when our plane challenge was in full swing, the planes he was turning out had gaps where they werenít peened closed fully.
    he seems to use on a lot of his planes, something to age the brass to give it a patina look, I think he might do it to hide or take attention off flaws in his work.
    But he does seem to be selling a lot of planesÖÖ
    and now books Ö
    ​Brad.

Page 10 of 11 FirstFirst ... 567891011 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Agreeable Theory
    By Breslau in forum WOODIES JOKES
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 23rd August 2013, 10:07 PM
  2. Theory on work
    By Allan at Wallan in forum WOODIES JOKES
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 5th September 2011, 10:14 AM
  3. Lathe Bed Theory
    By brendan stemp in forum WOODTURNING - GENERAL
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 3rd January 2011, 09:37 PM
  4. The Buffalo Theory
    By Bazza in forum WOODIES JOKES
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 31st January 2002, 05:33 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •