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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    vic clayton
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    1,042

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    good to see some sawdust shavings on the floor
    Some people are like slinkies - not really good for anything, but they
    bring a smile to your face when pushed down the stairs .

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    31
    Posts
    68

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    Hahahaha, Thank you!

    Yeah constant fine tuning, really just getting every panel to fit perfectly flush on everything, I won't settle for second best on that stuff.

    What's an extra 30 hours of shaping over a few hundred ours of project, just to have everything fit perfectly, and look the part.

    Plus now with more sheets on now, of all the boats I've built, seen built, and my helper has done and seen, it's come up the fairest bottom to date! So I'm currently ecstatic. Hopefully some BIG progress pics this weekend

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    31
    Posts
    68

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    IMG_5266.jpg

    Forward planking is on! This weekends MINIMUM was around 30 degrees Celsius, literally 42 deg. Max both days, another 5 in a row of this is really killing me. I want to put more time in, yet it is basically un-workable during daytime hours on the days I haven't worked.

    IMG_5267.jpg

    I guess night work is it for now!

    IMG_5268.jpg

    At least warm temperatures and fair winds meant I got in some serious diving this week along with some great racing! So it's really not all that bad, but sucks when you want to finish something, and you actually DO put in the time, and put your whole life on hold only for the weather to say nope, your going to take a few more weeks/months to get her done mate. Couldn't help but think in my head how much better everything would have been with the boat though ha-ha

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    6

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    You going great guns, you are a great boat builder for sure.
    i should not say it but was so cold here in Tasmania this morning 9 degrees, jumper on and heater going at work 4am. Pleasant 23 degree maximum with strong sea breeze outside now. No wonder they say Tasmania is the wooden boat building capital in Australia we especially in the NW have the best mild climate in Australia.

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    31
    Posts
    68

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    Cheers guys for all the words of support, it was finally great to get out and put in a couple 10 hour days this weekend!

    Please let me know if I should post more or less, I feel like a nuisance if I post too much, as I'd prefer the maximum substance possible!

    If there's anything anyone wants to see please let me know too, for EG. last weekend I propped the boat up higher for better access to the sides, as that is pretty much the next step, and changed the building stock to have a very large strong set of wheels (full castors, with locks for both rotation and twist). This was all done to boost hight for side panels access and to be able to move it around to coat the outside in epoxy and for primer and painting.

    Or if you want more pictures or close-ups etc (I don't know what everyone wants to actually see as I must have spend like 250+ hours working on it over about 15-17 weeks. I really should have kept a log or something, but oh-well. I am keeping a very accurate cost log though, but I'll break that down at the end, as there's no point dwelling over milk that's spilt, but only partly cleaned up ha-ha

    Onto actual boat build news, the first layer of the bottom is on here! 6.5mm AA Australian Hoop Pine, the stem line has come up extremely well, and the panels have all fit very very fair (hopefully this produces a great bottom!)

    IMG_5285.jpg

    Here is a shot from above, just for a different view

    Both opposing bottom panels have glued down just as well as the first side panels, couldn't find a spot along a stringer where it wasn't 100% glued. So I'm extremely happy with how these panels have gone on!

    IMG_5284.jpg

    Another shot, almost dead down the stem/keelson line. The joint along the stem and keelson has come up fantastically as well, I put in a lot of extra time fairing up all the stringers, chines and keelson prior to get this perfect, and it's paid off now!

    IMG_5286.jpg

    And the last picture here is dry-fitting the rear section on one side, and dry-fitting the bow on the opposing side, I have already started glueing the opposing side's second layer on! ...and PHWOAR she's strong! I can honestly say I'm shocked by the stiffness of the hull now.

    IMG_5299.jpg


    PS. Every single metal temporary fixing has been removed, and only epoxy is used to make the bonds. Not a single temporary hole actually passes clean through the timber as well, I used a depth limiter for all fixings, all glue is spread to exact thickness's evenly over the surface to ensure the best bond possible, and then everything is cleaned and filleted (not sure if that's always visible in the pictures)

    PPS. Mega thanks to my helper, this was pretty much all 2 peoples work (usually its like 4/5 hours solo and an hours help, but this was 2 people pretty much the whole time).

    Sadly though... My helper is away this weekend, so we'll try to get a few nights in this week so that it's back onto jobs 1 person can do for the weekend. Hopefully there is some big updates to come!

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    31
    Posts
    68

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    We ended up getting maybe 4 hours last night!

    Hopefully we'll get in another 4 Wednesday night, although I did 12 hours in the office yesterday then 4 hours, so might be pretty knackered after today's work and tonight's training

    I also tried taking some progression pictures, eg. Prior to works, cleaning up, mid works, glueing, finished works etc. I thought you guys might like to see how things are going together

  8. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    31
    Posts
    68

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    Ended up doing almost no work all weekend, sailing came first, still made a little progress this week, but sadly nothing special

    Oh well, most of the bottom is finished, last panel dry fit, all others glued.

    IMG_5300.jpg

    I will update next with a little set of progress images, just to show it all going together rather than just a finished photo.

    Currently toying with trailer ideas though, I'll have to design something up soon, and I'm kind-of tempted to do part of it as a "dolly" so it'll be easy to do it while the boat is still upside down, if anyone has any ideas, suggestions etc. it would be much appreciated!

    At the moment, I want... to do something like the F22 trailer that Ian Farrier produces, which is just spectacular, hopefully I'll finish the under carriage design soon so I can come up with a bed layout, then mould it off the under side of the hull in one big go...

    I was also looking at moulding in a sloping entry to make it as smooth as possible for launching and retrieving, and trying to remove all the points that a boat can bang into a trailer. I also haven't decided on lights... As I've had endless problems with submersible lights, and putting on and off a light bar, is a bit of a pain in the .

    See these link's below for what I'm possibly thinking of doing. (It also has the added bonus of protecting the underside of your boat from stones, and act's as a nice bed to walk up adn down for launching and retrieving).

    https://www.f-boatmart.com/product.p...15&cat=&page=1

    https://www.f-boatmart.com/product.p...56&cat=&page=1

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Eustis, FL, USA
    Posts
    2,270

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    The trailers you've linked are support trailers and not well suited for over the road, particularly on a wooden boat. You want to stay fairly conventional with as many centerline rollers as possible and bunks or "floppy" stands, near the turn of the bilge aft. This typical setup causes the least amount of issues with the boat and minimizes contact wear. Do not use rollers on the bottom planking or hull sides, only on the keel.

    LED lights are the foolproof way to go on a trailer. They're absolutely waterproof, so they don't short out or drown. If the wires are "heat shrinked" properly, connection issues go away too.

  10. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    31
    Posts
    68

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    Cheers mate,

    Yeah I was wondering about supporting the boat, what would really be the best way... I guess it's back to basic design time. Yeah I've heard much better things about lights, but they still can be a pain... I'll be doing them this time, so they'll be done right.

    Sadly more delays with building as the world match racing tour is going on here in Perth at the moment (main event starts Wednesday, but there's been racing and training going on out on the water, so I've been getting out to watch/sail as much as possible this past week.

    Spreading out epoxy on the last sheet going on, also spreading out epoxy on the boat where it is to go on, and on the joints with other panels, along with filling every single temporary fixing hole from fixing the last sheet.

    IMG_5301.jpg

    IMG_5306.jpg

    IMG_5305.jpg

  11. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Eustis, FL, USA
    Posts
    2,270

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    The best and most economical way of spreading epoxy I've found, is with a squeegee or plastic bog applicator. The idea with coatings are to get them of uniform thickness and spread them out quickly. A brush doesn't spread goo very evenly and it's slow. A roller does apply it evenly, given good technique, but there's a lot of waste with goo left in the roller, plus a roller can't get into a lot of places, because of it's size and shape. I've repeatedly found I can use a plastic applicator or squeegee, just about everywhere, even tight inside corners.

    I use two techniques for applying epoxy to surfaces, depending on what I need. On raw wood, I spread out the epoxy into an even film and let it sit for a few minutes, so it can soak in a bit. Once it's sat for a little, I go back over the previously wetted surface with a stiff putty knife, dragging it at a hard acute angle, pressing hard, bending the blade as I go. The idea is to smash this pooling goo, into the raw wood fibers and to scrape the excess from the area. This technique is for raw wood coating only and all but eliminates outgassing issues, because no pools of goo are left on the surface, for these bubbles to trickle up through. As I'm mashing and scraping the goo, I move any excess epoxy, to areas that haven't gotten wet yet, so I can do the same when I get to these areas.

    The other technique I use is on all subsequent coatings and usually is a squeegee, though a plastic applicator works too. The idea here is to apply a thin, uniform film thickness over everything. I just move it around with the squeegee, using uniform pressure throughout the process, which makes for a uniform film thickness (the whole point).

    To get the goo on the surface, I often pour it directly where I want it, then move it around, but you can also just dip the applicator or squeegee in the goo. The surface tension of the epoxy, will permit a surprising amount of it to stick to the applicator and with some practice, you can work relatively drip free, just dipping from the mixing pot to the work. Of course, holding the mixing cup over the work helps too.

  12. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    31
    Posts
    68

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    Cheers mate!

    The streaks that look like brush strokes are actually from 1st spreaders I use, I have been going over the boat in three very similar steps the 1st step I use is with a "v-notch" scraper, which I use to control how much glue thickness is spread out (see below image) the ones I have have very small notches, and are extremely efficient at spreading glue out evenly over the surface.

    mV6ghvWA4Wm202z2-ydkt1w.jpg

    Cheers though It's nice to hear how similar our method is.

  13. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Eustis, FL, USA
    Posts
    2,270

    Default

    I use notched spreaders on surfaces to be varnished, so the coating is as uniform as I can make it. I use a 1/32 trowel (.8 mm) because it leaves a thin coating and 1/16 (1.6 mm) is just too thick. The initial coats on raw wood is where I differ from most.

  14. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    31
    Posts
    68

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    Hi Guys,

    Apologies for the delay here, I blew a disc at the start of March, and work has slowed astronomically. But I've been getting out whenever I can physically so there is still progress.

    IMG_5682.jpg

    Shaping up the edge of the ply ready for the remaining 3 layers of the chines!

    IMG_5692.jpg

    Slowing getting there, but in the end, it came up absolutely fantastic!

    IMG_5696.jpg

    Dry-fitting the chines first layer, little shot from above.

    IMG_5700.jpg

    My dog hates being left inside, at least he lends a paw when he can.

    IMG_5713.jpg

    The big man helping me with epoxy work, he's been putting in some solid hours to help me, so serious big-ups to him!

    IMG_5874.jpg

    Continuing the laminates! The boat looks so different now, I think I'm in love with the reverse chine.

    IMG_6006.jpg

    Also put in some time on the car, built in timber mounts to the doors, dyna-matted the car, and wired up a great sound system. (I do some serious km's so it's well worth it, really makes those 15 hour drive a lot easier!)

    IMG_6012.jpg

    Also put in some time to rig up a Corsair 750 a friend bought, first time rigging up a top-down furler. But she's working a treat and took her to victory in the HMAS Perth regatta.

    IMG_6038.jpg

    Chines fully laminated up, oh my jesus she is strong! AND BEAMY!

    IMG_6039.jpg

    Very very happy with how the chines came together!

    As an extra note, every single item that can be seen, every end piece has a routed quarter round the the edges, you can probably see this in the last image.

    Back has been healing very well, so work has been speeding up again! Hoo-ray

    Hopefully there is more progress soon.

    Regards,
    Nels

  15. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    31
    Posts
    68

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    Stringers are on the sides, everything went really well, each glue join has nice fillets, hopefully onto shaping up the gunwale and chine to suit the side panels this week, and then moving onto starting to put the sides on this weekend!

    If anyone has any information on doing the bow area it would be much appreciated as I haven't got much experience with the style of planking which goes around the flare of the bow.

    Also, I am currently looking at wrapping the entire boat in "Innegra" fibre Innegra Woven Fabric 4 Shaft Satin 135g/m2 1270mm - Innegra - Woven Fabrics

    Any comments on the Innegra would be much appreciated as I think I have found out all I can in my research. Really after something that will protect the boat, not be brittle like carbon, heavy like glass or heinous to work with like kevlar...

    IMG_6326.jpg

    IMG_6333.jpg

    IMG_6334.jpg

  16. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Eustis, FL, USA
    Posts
    2,270

    Default

    These polypropylene fabrics are usually employed with other fabrics and some are woven with other fibers. This is because it's modulus is fairly low. It's commonly used to improve penetration and abrasion resistance. I'd be interested in knowing it's resin take up rate, as these fabrics tend to suck up material like crazy. Will this be the outer sheathing? If so, you'll have to paint, as it'll dry milky, not transparent like 'glass does. Carbon would be a waste on this boat, offering no real benefit. Kevlar, spectra and aramid fiber would also be a waste, unless the scantlings are adjusted to gain some advantage (weight lose). There's no advantage to placing these types of fabric between the planking layers.

    If looking for a bright finish, 'glass is really the only choice and it should be under 4 ounce (135 GSM) cloth, if you don't want to see the weave. If the hull will be painted, Dynel and Xynole are the usual choices, though this will add a bit of weight. Sheathing weight shouldn't be much of a concern for this build, simply because the scantlings are pretty stout anyway and the few pounds you'll gain with a sheathing, isn't going to make a noticeable difference, to her performance envelop.

    As to the planking on the bow, well you'll have fun with this. I'll assume the plans call for a double diagonal, which require spiling each to fit. If the hull is to be brightly finished, the out layer is usually fitted fore and aft, further testing your resolve in the bow areas. There's no real tricks to offer, just take your time and work for good fits and given your work thus far, I'm sure it'll look fine.

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