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Thread: Tom Cat

  1. #136
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Toowoomba
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    68
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    320

    Default 59 Laminated Frames

    The time came to get out the trusty steam box and get stuck in! You can refer to post #15 for a gander at my set up. I have gone ahead and steamed and installed the initial lot. Frame 5 was first as it had minimal fore and aft bend requirement. As you can see by the pics it went pretty well but the laminates at Frame 1 Stbd haven’t come out as I wanted. The fore and aft twist in the frame was just too great for the set up I had. It would appear I will need to bevel the danged thing after gluing up. I think I learnt something in the process as the Port side went much better. I don’t think the original 10 mins in steam was enough so hit the Port for 15 mins the second time around and it looks OK.


    DSC01659-1.jpg DSC01661-1.jpg DSC01670-1.jpg

    DSC01666-1.jpg DSC01671-1.jpg DSC01662-1.jpg

    Frame 4 and 5 Pt and Stbd are in so now onto more construction work with the steam box. I needed to extend it to cater for the rest of the frames as they span the boat athwartships. This is complete and I have also decided to attempt Frame 2 utilising the Mould that came out of that position. There is much twist to the frame here so maybe this will give me a better chance at clamping in the right place etc. Anyhow, nothing ventured, nothing gained as the saying goes.

    DSC01663-1.jpg DSC01665-1.jpg

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  3. #137
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Toowoomba
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    Default 60 Laminated Frames Cont…

    Work has been continuing unabated but slowly. The pics show the progress – clamps and stuff everywhere! Just Frame 3 and 8 require steaming which will enable me to put the box away and make some room in the shed. Frames 1, 4 and 5 Pt and Stbd have been steamed, dried, glued up, removed and dressed to width and put back awaiting fitting and final glued installation. Frames 2, 6 and 7 have been steamed and are awaiting drying prior to initial glue up. As you can see the inside of the boat is an interesting array of clamps, blocks and rope!


    DSC01673-1.jpg DSC01675-1.jpg DSC01676-1.jpg DSC01678-1.jpg

    What I learnt is that it was difficult to get any sort of twist in the frames - just not enough purchase anywhere to push the laminates against the inside of the hull with enough force to make the twist happen. Subsequently I will have to individually fit them by planing in an amount of bevel that will bring the frame in contact all the way around. The middle frames will be OK but there will be some work required with those in the ends of the boat ie. 1, 2, 3, little bit of 6, 7 and 8. Oh well, some chalk and patience will be the order of the day.


    Currently awaiting the frames to dry from steaming to free up blocks and clamps.

  4. #138
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    Default 61 Laminated Frames Cont…

    Well I finally got to the end of the laminating task and have run the frames thru the router on the inner faces to round over the edges and more importantly, from my perspective anyway, reduce some of the heavy T.Oak meat that is in these 19x19 frames. I figure with the heavy layup of biaxial glass this will not make a lot of difference but will improve the look considerably. I used a 12mm quarter round bit and I’m already impressed with what they look like without any finishing work.

    Next job is to bevel the hull bearing surfaces to get a good fit prior to final glue up installation of the frames. If you look closely at the pics you may be able to pick up the shadow that needs to disappear with this process to give me a good join between hull and frame. I’m thinking of a combo of spoke shave and belt sander to complete the job. There shouldn’t be a lot to do – the ends will need a fair whack but the frames amidships won’t need a lot of work.

    Keep you posted!

    DSC01679-1.jpg DSC01680-1.jpg DSC01682-1.jpg DSC01684 (2).JPG

  5. #139
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    Default 62 Laminated Frames Complete

    DSC01687-1.jpg


    It’s done so I thought a single pic would keep the interested, interested!

    Now it’s just a matter of sand to look spiffy and install.

  6. #140
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Adelaide
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    2,139

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    I'm still with you Laurie thanks, you've just about inspired me to get back at at it.

    Cheers
    Mike
    "Working to a rigidly defined method of doubt and uncertainty"

  7. #141
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Sunshine Coast, Queensland
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    30

    Default

    Exceptionally nice work. I am envious of how neat your work is.

  8. #142
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    Default 63 Laminated Frames Installed

    Things move so slowly here during the winter months. Temperatures in this part of the world hover around 10-15 degrees for about an hour a day and other than that it’s even colder. Oh well not as bad as Europe during winter I s’pose. However I need to pick my times to open up the shed so consequently it’s about one frame a day that goes in the boat and nothing on weekends. I wouldn’t even get that done if it wasn’t for the situation I’m in that allows some time during the working day to get over there.

    DSC01691-1.jpg DSC01690-1.jpg

    So…they’re all in! BUT ….still some work to do. I have been filleting each frame as I have been going but have run out of mix on the odd occasion so need to go back and ensure I have that covered off where necessary. I use a paddle pop stick for the initial fillet and, if I have left over glue mix, use a tongue depressor to enlarge it. The larger fillet is not required on both sides in either end of the boat where the angle between frame and hull becomes acute. I just need to go back and create the larger fillet where I think it’s necessary. I also need to create an even larger fillet along each side of the CB case to Keelson join. There is also the question of supports for the Floor Boards where they join end for end – need to add a couple of those as I need to cater for the Floor Boards being in sections. I haven’t quite worked them out yet – need to get the Margins in to get a better picture. Also need a couple behind the sloping CB Support. They’re ready, just need to glue and screw them in with a bit of left over epoxy.

  9. #143
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    Dec 2007
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    Default 64 Mast Step Reinforcement

    Nearly forgot...whilst the weather hasn’t had me jumping out of my skin to get into epoxy I took an interlude to do something a little bit fancy. I have never been all that happy with the narrowness of the Mast Step so I went and purchased a bit of scrap brass plate (6mm thick) and cut out a reinforcement piece for the Step. I made a blue on the other side and you can see where the drill nearly came thru. I’m not concerned as I will be bedding this in so no loss of strength. Pity, I thought I was doing a bang up job on this an’ all. I still need to inlay it but it will look good even if no one ever gets to see it!

    DSC01692-1.jpg DSC01693-1.jpg DSC01694-1.JPG

  10. #144
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    Dec 2007
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    Default 63 Flooring Supports

    All the filleting is now complete and the supports for the Floor Boards are in. Here I took the opportunity to use up some scraps I had lying around. Forward I laminated some Tas Oak to Paulownia and Aft laminated some Hoop Pine to Paulownia. This provides a good bearing surface for the Flooring and provides some weight savings in the Supports themselves. That’s the thinking anyway! I am considering using Paulownia for the deck support structures as well. I think this will depend on the quality of the Paulownia when I get to it in the stack I have. However, I won’t use it up forward where the large Breast Hook for the Mast Support is required or aft for the Quarter Knees. Here I will stick to the Hoop.

    I have also installed the Supports behind the sloping CB Case Support so am ready to finally move on to a final internal sanding, couple of coats of epoxy and then should be ready for the steaming and installation of the Sheer Clamps.

    DSC01696-1.jpg DSC01699-1.jpg DSC01700-1.jpg DSC01702-1.jpg DSC01703-1.jpg

    Nearly forgot - you may notice I have added some drainage holes in the CB Case Supports, one either side. I was uncomfortbale with the space between the Support and the Floor itself (peace of mind thing, you know!)
    Last edited by Dry Water; 18th Aug 2012 at 07:35 PM. Reason: Addition of drainage hole info.

  11. #145
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Eustis, FL, USA
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    2,270

    Default

    Round over the fillets near the weep holes, so you don't get debris hanging up there, as things drain to the low point. Also at the back of the centerboard case there appears to be a "choke point" where the sole support meets the centerboard case and flowing water has to "dog leg" around the plywood case support. I'd cut a weep hole in the location or build up enough fillet to make an easy transition around the plywood brace( which you may have, but I can't see in the picture). This is an enjoyable build to follow along with, keep up the good work.

  12. #146
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    Default 66 Sheer Clamp Supports

    Thanks for the heads up PAR – I will make that happen. It’s pretty good right now but I can do further work to smooth it out further as you say.

    This post is covering the need to have some blocking between the hull and the Sheer Clamp in way of the Breast Hook and the Quarter Knees. To complete this I have used Paulownia and to ensure the Sheer is not pulled out of line when finally clamping up, after fitting, I have resawn the blocking to enable the pieces be far more flexible when gluing up.
    I have completed this in two stages –

    1. they have been fit, resawn and the two pieces glued together
    2. and have epoxyed the pieces in place.

    I have used a polyurethane glue (Purbond) to bring them together. This process has given me blocking that fits the hull surfaces without any shaping of the timber.
    To ensure they didn’t glue themselves to the hull during the process I used some foil as you can see in the photos. On completion it was a simple matter to remove the foil, remove excess glue and dress up underneath where it is the only face exposed and finally epoxy in place.
    I am now ready to steam in the Sheer Clamps.

    DSC01705-1.jpg DSC01707-1.jpg DSC01710-1.jpg

    DSC01708-1.jpg DSC01712-1.jpg DSC01713-1.jpg

  13. #147
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    Default 67 Sheer Clamps

    This didn’t at all according to plan. My inexperience has shown thru like a new sunrise! Yes it was inevitable that I missed something really, really important. Edge Set!!!!! Wood 63mm in width by 10mm thick doesn’t like to be bent on edge! After steaming for 40 mins I thought it would be a doddle to bend in place but the answer was a resounding No! (many expletives go in this space!!) I had to pull it out and take the position of Rodin’s sculpture “The Thinker”!! ie. back to the drawing board and do some research.

    Lo and behold I find a thread on the build of a Marsh Cat 15 and find one answer that would do the trick. Also found another answer in Barry Thomas’s book “Building the Crosby Catboat”- now to make up my mind which one. Laminate up the width in a jig or cut and splice? Laminate it is the decision so off to the boat, idea in hand. Take some MDF (similar to door skin material) 4mm thick, cut into two strips 200mm wide and attach to the inside of the frames with clamps in such a way as to cover the entire length of the Sheer. Staple the two pieces together so they are immobile when removed from the boat.

    DSC01718-1.jpg DSC01719-1.jpg DSC01720-1.jpg

    Trace the Sheer Line onto the MDF, remove from boat and Oh, Yes! no wonder the damned thing wouldn’t bend into place! The edge set is over 100mm!!! Idiot!! It was never going to go into place with that sort of set.
    Refer the pics. Pray for me!

    DSC01721-1.jpg DSC01722-1.jpg

  14. #148
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    Feb 2008
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    Eustis, FL, USA
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    Well, you wanted to practice a nibbed scarf anyway, right?

    When bending pieces like this you have to work in all 3 axis, which sucks and is imposable on piece of those dimensions. What I try to do is get the wost one in, without the other two screwing with the results. You can get that plank to bend the 4" or so you need on the flat with a jig, some heat and slowly forcing it into a jig. This is a lot of trouble, but sometimes the piece warrants it. I've had rub rails and bulwarks that having given me this trouble and I usually make a jig, so I can pull it into the curve, typically the edge set way. I usually over curve it a bit, as solid stock likes to spring back. A curve that's 10% tighter usually works.

    Now the piece will try to cup and twist, so this has to be restrained too. My general route is to make the curve on a work bench, set up "dogs" (blocks of wood screwed to the bench) for the clamps to bear against, then some sort of restraint to keep the piece flat during the bend. These are usually just hefty pieces of solid stock on top of the dogs that will only permit the bending stock to lay on the flat (sort of "L" shaped). Weights help too.

    As to the actual bend, heat is the ticket. bath towels are wrapped around the piece, then boiling water poured over them. I let these sit until starting to cool, then more boiling water. With your piece, I'd wait an hour to an hour and a half with this boiling water routine, soaking them every 15 minutes or so. It should be pretty limber by then, so out comes the heat gun and the towels come off, as it's put in the jig. Clamp and heat, clamp and heat, sneaking up on the bend a little at a time. I start it the worst portion of the bend and work out towards the ends as I go. This last piece I did like this was an 18' long 1x4 (5.5 m 25 x 01 mm) bulwark, with about 12" (305 mm) of edge set. It took most of the day and I had to do 4 of them (doubled up for each bulwark). The bulwarks could have been strip planked and it would have been much easier, say using two pieces of 1.5" (38 mm) square stock, but I didn't want the horizontal seam. The vertical laminate was to be capped, so wouldn't been seen, hence the vertical sandwich, with huge edge set.

    A 10 mm piece will be a bugger, but you can sneak up on it, apply more boiling water, steam or heat and continue on.

  15. #149
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    Default 68 Sheer Clamps cont…

    Thanks for all the advice PAR but I ended up taking the easier route (I think!!).
    As you can see I decided to cut the existing planks up into manageable widths and ended up with 4 layers vertically and the original two layers horizontally.

    DSC01724-1.jpg DSC01725-1.jpg DSC01726-1.jpg

    It wasn’t hard to do but I could only do one glue-up per day so it’s taken the full week to get them completed. I have cleaned them up initially with the belt sander to remove the excess epoxy and then run them thru the planer so that’s the finish in the photos below. Overall the thickness went from 19mm down to 17mm so considering the construction method I can live with the new dimension.

    All they need now is finally gluing the two lengths together for each side, finish sanding and a couple of coats of epoxy before finally installing them. About another weeks work with the time I have for the project.
    The beautiful thing is they went in right on the money with no hint of edge set to contend with and fit is really great!

    DSC01728-1.jpg DSC01727-1.jpg DSC01729-1.jpg

  16. #150
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    Default 69 Sheer Clamps cont…

    Haven’t had much chance to do a lot this week but managed to get the Clamps finally glued up. Next job is to sand, a couple of coats of epoxy and install. Just thought I’d share a pic of the Port side glue job.


    DSC01732-1.jpg DSC01733-1.jpg

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