Thanks Thanks:  0
Needs Pictures Needs Pictures:  0
Picture(s) thanks Picture(s) thanks:  0
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    16

    Default Radiata Pine for canal boat

    Greetings.
    I am keen to build an Escargot canal boat as designed by Philip Thiel, but with a 6hp outboard.
    Unfortunately, the Venezia is just too big for me to construct. Sorry Mik!
    She is very simply designed being only 18'6" x 6' with flat bottom and sides.
    The recommended framing is 4x2 and 3x2 (all dimensions are in feet and inches) and I am wondering if I can get away with using Radiata pine with marine plywood skin.
    I am in Tassy and know I should use Oregon, Fir etc. but will have to travel to source some.
    What if the Radiata is epoxy coated before painting? Will it stay nice and straight as she will be on a trailer most of the time?
    Perhaps I should cut them out of ply and laminate up to the moulded dimensions.
    Any advice most welcome. Brent

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    used to live in Sydney, now it's Canada
    Age
    64
    Posts
    10,751

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by B_Kennedy View Post
    Perhaps I should cut them out of ply and laminate up to the moulded dimensions.
    Hi Brent

    I think that might your best option.
    That or travelling to source Oregon or fir
    regards from Canada

    ian

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Thanks Ian. I have a few days off so will go for a drive and look at alternative timbers. If I had an unlimited budget of course I could use Huon, Celery or King William too! ;-)

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    2,941

    Default

    My experience with building timber boats is limited to building a wherry, a rowing skiff and a canoe, so I'm by no means an expert. However, when building my boats I had the same question.

    I assume you are talking about nice clear radiata, not the knotty stuff.

    Personally, I can't see any reason not to use it - except perhaps weight.

    Radiata is strong, not overly heavy, machines well, stable once dried, and glues reliably. Treated, it will not rot even when used underwater.

    I never actually used it because my builds were too weight sensitive, but I'd like to hear any real reason not to on a build like yours.

    I think the plan you have chosen suits (and was designed for) utility materials, not expensive stuff.
    Apologies for unnoticed autocomplete errors.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Thanks for the info. Yes, I looked at some DAR 90x45 and 70x45 perfectly straight and knot free. I hadn't considered using Radiata until I saw that. A coat of epoxy under paint wouldn't hurt either. I also found that the New Zealand Zephyr dinghy, designed and built 60 years ago used Radiata pine. Apparently, many are still in good condition today.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    2,941

    Default

    I think that when we build boats everyone wants to make them as waterproof as possible but really it's easy to overthink it. If it's a trailer boat and its kept under cover then really it's not a boat it's a piece of furniture that gets wet ocassionally.

    I'm not aware of any difference in inherent water resistance between radiata, Oregon and spruce. I think the weight difference may lead people to preference the latter two, but really as timbers they are second rate, especially modern plantation Oregon.

    I did envelope-coat my boats in epoxy. I do endorse that - it does work.

    I repeat, I'm not an expert. It will be interesting to hear from anyone with genuine experience using radiata in boat building.
    Apologies for unnoticed autocomplete errors.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    16

    Default Found Oregon

    Had a bit of a hunt around and found some Oregon that is imported from Canada. Lots of tight knots and a few $$$ more per metre than Radiata with about the same rot resistance and interestingly, about the same weight. It has tighter growth rings so may be stronger, but I don't think that outweighs the cost in this application.
    I might use Radiata for some parts, Tas Oak for others and perhaps some Celery Top pine for the chine runners.
    Might ask around at the Australian Wooden Boat Festival in a few weeks. B

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Aberfoyle Park SA
    Age
    58
    Posts
    1,784

    Default

    If you use treated pine, then rot won't be a problem.
    Radiata grows quickly & is therefore not as strong as slower growing species with tighter growth rings.
    Radiata probably makes sense as a filleting material in chine logs & sheer clamps.
    Would have thought Tas Oak the better choice for chine runners & outwales - harder wearing.
    cheers
    Alan J

    Nothing says "Unprofessional Job" so loudly as wrinkles in the duct tape. - B.Spencer

Similar Threads

  1. Radiata pine outside
    By jmaramis in forum TIMBER
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 9th Nov 2011, 02:03 PM
  2. Is radiata pine that bad!
    By Chipman in forum WOODWORK PICS
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 30th Jun 2008, 10:25 AM
  3. Slash pine vs Radiata pine
    By danth in forum TIMBER
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 13th Jun 2008, 02:21 AM
  4. I know its just radiata pine...
    By Cruzi in forum BOX MAKING
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 21st Aug 2007, 02:45 PM
  5. Radiata Pine (pinus radiata)
    By TreeFriend in forum TIMBER
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11th Jul 2007, 10:47 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •