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  1. #166
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    Oregon, USA
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    225

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    I've moved on to the jamb and threshold for the doors. It is nearly the same construction as for the window apart from a difference in naming. Instead of a stool and sill there are the same pieces assembled as a two part threshold. And since the door threshold is longer there are two dovetailed and wedged tenons that drop into mortices in the floor beam. These prevent the threshold from bowing up in the middle. Yes, I could just screw them down or screw up from below, but what fun would that be? The ends have the same splines as the window stool to keep the ends from lifting up or twisting. Installation is also the same: cut the threshold a hair over length (and scribed to any deviation of the post faces from 90 degrees), then spread the posts with some reverse clamps to allow the threshold to drop in.

    The dovetailed tenons:

    CF4BDF0F-BC03-4E8A-B56A-D56F56A12DA4_1_201_a.jpg03F1DBF5-9B3E-47B6-AE58-A72CF9B0AD1C.jpgFFD9E49F-9ED9-4F98-8C98-B43DD66EDCEE.jpg


    And installation. Post have been spread a bit and ready to install.

    BC7FA3E3-00D2-4A5B-BE51-76ABA291839E_1_105_c.jpeg

    Ready to tap down. Another quarter turn on the clamps needed for clearance.

    B2BEA6C7-5CD2-4B5B-B7A4-55A9F058D38F_1_105_c.jpeg

    And almost down.

    5A4A934B-2C08-46F1-9F59-BE352F0E2DBD_1_105_c.jpeg

    Success!

    E4CFDEB6-6720-41B8-B130-EB1AC6BE6B44_1_105_c.jpeg

    And wedged.

    80FE2C94-CB65-49C5-B63D-73709DB50BDA_1_105_c.jpeg

    And a tight fit at the posts at both ends. Whew!

    51501223-1665-41B9-B3BF-F9D4A21C6AE6_1_201_a.jpg3423C845-9092-4140-B220-BAFA8A1D4BDA_1_105_c.jpeg

    I will say that I was a little disappointed in my first attempt with the window. But I learned a lot from that and I feel pretty good about the door.

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  3. #167
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    225

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    Here is the rest of the window jamb. The sill has grooves routed to accept 1/8" stainless steel bar stock as tracks for rollers that I'll inset into the window sash. End grain of the upper jamb piece are covered with white linseed oil paint. The sill is joined to the side jambs with a housed through mortice and tenon. The side jambs are joined to the top with dovetails. There are holes drilled for mounting screws and mortices for plugs to cover the screw heads.

    I have the external door jamb done almost exactly the same way but it is difficult to photograph in a way that shows anything interesting. Imagine the same but twice as wide and tall.

    6AC1EEB6-7EF9-4A8E-B9AC-37823C60FCAC_1_201_a.jpeg309111E1-B14A-45B6-A282-FF99B8FC71BA_1_105_c.jpeg81698DEC-B46C-4F92-985F-6114B083556D_1_105_c.jpeg

    Although in essence just a simple box, the trick is that in modern western framing (at least in the US, an I assume in Oz), window jambs are built solid and square and them shimmed into a rough opening. Gaps are flashed and covered with trim and caulked. In this old school Japanese construction, the jambs also have to be square so the windows/doors don't bind but must be fit to the shed frame without trim or caulk. As a first time amateur I'm pretty sure mine won't be up to Japanese carpenter standards. I'm concerned about weather tightness over the long term. On the other hand, this is a shed. And I'm old enough that my long term is probably short enough to not worry about it.

  4. #168
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    225

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    We got a few days of dry weather. That allowed me with my neighbour's help to install the roof flashing. We hope to start installing the metal panels tomorrow. Since the underlayment is also on, the roof is water resistant enough to take the tarp off. At least long enough to get the panels up there.

    15762B65-1E24-4424-8FD3-AFBFD61C1CCE_1_105_c.jpeg

  5. #169
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    225

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    And between rains we got a few of the terne panels up. It took more brain work that I like to figure out where to snip and fold the panels on the rake ends.; The manufacturers instructions were meager. But I think we have a system, now.

    F3FB455C-6F27-4428-ACA1-BDD3BA847D52_4_5005_c.jpeg

  6. #170
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    225

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    Roofing on sunny days. Windows in progress on rainy days. This time of year it is about 50:50 so I'm going back and forth.

    6B086D86-6E3F-4B80-AB3C-D03082599B84_1_105_c.jpeg

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