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  1. #31
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    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cklett View Post
    Ok half way through peening.

    I researched a bit and everyone I saw started om the sole and then yhe sides. Bill Carter said this way the sides will be pulled onto the sole plate.

    However that did not work for me. I tried to clamp and screw the plane parts onto the wood block as good as possible, but it kept moving on me and the sides moved away from the sole. So I decided to do the side first and get it nice and tight as good as I could.



    On this side I think I had not enough steel sticking out. Other side is more. And then I think I also overdid it hen putting a little bevel on the corners of the brass tails. So I had to move the steel quite a bit and some corners probably not enough to get all the way into the corner. I was using a rounded punch to help directing the blows better into the corner.



    Still quite a few mishits and my arm hurts [emoji6]

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    Looking great but I feel the pain,
    I donít know if it helps , but once Iím at the stage you are at now CK,I then went over the dovetails again but using the flat end of your hammer, assuming your using a engineering hammer,
    An just planish them down a bit more,
    It seemed to work for me !

    Cheers Matt.
    Boy the forum is quite this weekend

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Brisbane
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    407

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    Yeah, the forum feels quiet.

    Not sure what you mean with engineering hammer. These are the hammers I use.



    The big one in the middle I use most of the time. And the very right only together with the punch. It feels better for that. And for further flattening the very left. I am still trying different things.

    I do not have an anvil so I use one corner of my workbench with a block of hardwood underneath. I saw some do it on the floor, but that is too low for me. I feel I won't see what I am doing.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  4. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Millmerran,QLD
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    70
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    8,752

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cklett View Post
    Yeah, the forum feels quiet.

    Not sure what you mean with engineering hammer. These are the hammers I use.



    The big one in the middle I use most of the time. And the very right only together with the punch. It feels better for that. And for further flattening the very left. I am still trying different things.

    I do not have an anvil so I use one corner of my workbench with a block of hardwood underneath. I saw some do it on the floor, but that is too low for me. I feel I won't see what I am doing.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    The two hammers in the middle are the engineer's hammers or ball pein hammers. I would expect you to use these primarily and mainly the round ball. The hammer on the left is a planishing hammer and is used more with sheet metal mainly in auto body work: Matt can tell you more about that.

    I have a hammer like the one on the right, but I am not absolutely sure of its name. I suspect it is a blacksmith's hammer.

    I have not had much in the way of peining experience, but you may find that your block of wood on the bench is cushioning. A hardwood stump , if you had one, might be better, but really you probably do need a good lump of metal to hammer on. I don't have an anvil, but use a piece of railway iron instead.

    Don't be despondent. I think your plane is coming along very well.

    Regards
    Paul
    Bushmiller;

    "Power tends to corrupt. Absolute power corrupts, absolutely!"

  5. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    838

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushmiller View Post
    I have a hammer like the one on the right, but I am not absolutely sure of its name. I suspect it is a blacksmith's hammer.
    I’d call that a cross pein hammer.

  6. #35
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    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cklett View Post
    Yeah, the forum feels quiet.

    Not sure what you mean with engineering hammer. These are the hammers I use.



    The big one in the middle I use most of the time. And the very right only together with the punch. It feels better for that. And for further flattening the very left. I am still trying different things.

    I do not have an anvil so I use one corner of my workbench with a block of hardwood underneath. I saw some do it on the floor, but that is too low for me. I feel I won't see what I am doing.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

    CK
    The two hammers in the centre are what I call engineers hammers.
    Or Ball peen hammers.
    The one on the far left is a panel beaters shaping hammer, but is not a planishing hammer they have a flatter and rounder head and are quite light.
    The hammers on the far right Iíve seen in blacksmiths shops , but have no idea what itís purpose is.

    I used this set up for my challenge plane,
    Itís not perfect, but it got me there


    Cheers Matt.

  7. #36
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Brisbane
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    407

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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin62 View Post
    Iíd call that a cross pein hammer.
    I only know it as a general purpose hammer. Back home in Germany that is the typical hammer in each tool kit. I only got introduced to the claw hammer which is typical here much later.

    Actually the hammer on the right is my late dad's one. That's also why I didn't clean it up. The paint reminds me of the jeans he was always wearing full of paint stains as well. And I don't know how the end of the handle got burned. But he was a heavy smoker. Constantly with a cigarette in the corner of his mouth. He would never bother knocking off the ashes. Just waiting for it to fall off by itself.

    Anyway, sorry I digress. As said we only had hammers like this. I was told when first putting small nails in you use the thin tapered end. You can hit the nail head between your fingers first until the nail gets hold. Then you drive it home with the flat end.

    And if you needed to pull a nail out we had one of those:



    At least this was when I grew up. Could have also only be my dad's way. Who knows [emoji6]

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Dandenong Ranges
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    745

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    Hi CK. And I call those pincers . I have a pair that live in my tool belt. Not as nice a those though.

  9. #38
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    May 2019
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    Brisbane
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    I am afraid now that I made a dog's breakfast of it. The first side worked om I think. But when I worked on the other side the side plate moved on the block and a bit away from the sole. By the time I noticed that it was too late. As a result I did not have much brass left sticking out at the bottom to close the gaps on the sole.

    Now I am worried that it will mot be as strong are even full of gaps. Although I even took it off the stuffing and see if I can still correct something. But it was already too rigid. So I put it back in and finished the bashing.

    For the next one I need to rethink how to secure the plane parts on the peening stuffing so it does not move.




    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  10. #39
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    May 2019
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    Brisbane
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    Ok, maybe I still saved it. I just kept going and close the gaps on the outside. Now I feel better again.





    Quite some big gaps on the inside. They'll be covered by the stuffing though.



    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  11. #40
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    Oct 2010
    Location
    NSW
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    That's coming along nicely.

  12. #41
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    Nov 2011
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    Melbourne
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    Well will you look at that.
    CK thatís looking good, a little bit of a roller coaster the last few days,but you have come through looking good.

    Cheers Matt.

  13. #42
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    May 2019
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    Brisbane
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    Yep. A bit like a roller coaster. I must admit this dovetail plane making is a bit nerve racking. Yoi smash it all together until it looks like a complete mess and then hope to find the beauty underneath when you file and sand it down again.

    But also soooo rewarding!

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  14. #43
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    Feb 2016
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    Canberra
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    Fascinating.

    With the gaps on the inside and perhaps the bottom, could one braise it to fill?

    On the sides, that has a very nice scratch pattern. I'm looking to do the same. How is it done?

    I found a few 3M wheels that offer such a thing, but I'm not a metal worker

  15. #44
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    May 2019
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    Brisbane
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    Fascinating.

    With the gaps on the inside and perhaps the bottom, could one braise it to fill?

    On the sides, that has a very nice scratch pattern. I'm looking to do the same. How is it done?

    I found a few 3M wheels that offer such a thing, but I'm not a metal worker
    I don't think I am going to fill the gaps separately or so. Once the infill goes in they are not visible and will fill with the epoxy I'll use to glue the infill in.

    The scratch pattern just comes from my bench top belt sander with 80 grit for now. I will sand it to some finer grits later. But probably won't polish it. Just finer grits till I am happy with the finish.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  16. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodPixel View Post
    Fascinating.

    With the gaps on the inside and perhaps the bottom, could one braise it to fill?

    On the sides, that has a very nice scratch pattern. I'm looking to do the same. How is it done?

    I found a few 3M wheels that offer such a thing, but I'm not a metal worker
    We never talk about the Gaps on the inside WP,itís a kind of we all get them, we all hate them, we all understand,[emoji6][emoji6][emoji6].

    Cheers Matt.

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