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  1. #16
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    Oct 2007
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    Sydney
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    You're on a hiding to nothing if you try to brute force a fence post out. RC nailed it, dig a "dam" around the post down about 300 mm, fill up the dam, stand back and have a beer. After it's began soaking in grab the top of the post and wrench it back and forth to open up the hole it's in. Keep the dam full. As water starts to go between the post and the hole it will get easier to move back and forth. Keep doing that until the post is very easy to move through a large range. Then just lift the post out.

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Minbun, FNQ, Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by cba_melbourne View Post
    Agree, but it needs to be more than a compact tractor, or the front wheels will lift off the ground without the post moving. The best is to do this sort of job in summer when the soil is dry and has shrunk away from the posts.
    I can manage with my little Kubota BX1830, as I said, sometimes it needs a nudge. I also find that a bit of reverse while lifting helps keep the front down.
    Cliff.
    If you find a post of mine that is missing a pic that you'd like to see, let me know & I'll see if I can find a copy.

  4. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Armidale NSW
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    The success of using water to extract posts does depend on the soil type. We have heavy clay soil and when it is wet it expands and grips the posts even tighter ... and on occasion actually creates a seal and a vacuum when you try and lift the post.

    The beauty of the tripod or tractor method is there is no heavy lifting.
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
    __________________________________________________
    Bite off more than you can chew and then chew like crazy.

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ballina N.S.W.
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    371

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    Hi Ken,
    As a retired farmer I have removed a lot of fence and gate posts. We usually just wrapped a chain around them a couple of times and used the hydraulics on the tractor. As you do not have a tractor but have a jack and an A frame the water technique that has been suggested will work, just give it time often several days. If you had a pump and could attach a metal spear to it and pump water all the way down the sides of the post while you had tension on it with your jack A frame set up it would come out fairly easily.
    Bob

  6. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    2,660

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    this is what I did
    Wrap (2-3 wraps) chain down low

    very long lever over fulcrum support and they pulled out easily.

    I think I used a 5m 60mm water pipe as that was what was going back in

  7. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Jervis Bay South Coast NSW
    Posts
    354

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    For steel posts on the farm we would hit them on the top with a sledge hammer which drives them into the ground a little bit further but in doing so breaks the bind with the surrounding dirt. Not sure how it'd go on wooden posts

    Sent from my SM-T530 using Tapatalk

  8. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Melbourne
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    66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vernonv View Post
    The success of using water to extract posts does depend on the soil type. We have heavy clay soil and when it is wet it expands and grips the posts even tighter ... and on occasion actually creates a seal and a vacuum when you try and lift the post.

    The beauty of the tripod or tractor method is there is no heavy lifting.
    I am on clay soil too. In summer the soil recedes and wide cracks open everywhere. The soil rectracts leaving about 10mm of air all around wooden posts. That is the season when the posts can be pulled straight up *) without any effort at all. In winter it's the opposite, the soil expans with moisture and firmly grips the posts.

    *) that is nice round treated pine posts, in summer I can remove them without tractor just by hand. The older odd shaped split redgum posts are tapered (wider at the bottom) and much harder to pull.

  9. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    530

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    Wrap a chain around bottom of post, attach other end of chain to car, tractor, whatever, get a post 1.5m high and place under chain about 300mm away from fencepost, you will need something to hold it in place tonight stop it from toppling over. Jump in vehicle and drive. Fencepost is pulled straight up following the line of least resistance. They come out easy like pulling a popsicle stick out of an icecream.

  10. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Minbun, FNQ, Australia
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    That'll work... if you can get somebody to hold it in place while you drive off.
    Cliff.
    If you find a post of mine that is missing a pic that you'd like to see, let me know & I'll see if I can find a copy.

  11. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
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    530

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    Works every time. Forgot to mention the post needs to lent toward the fencepost so the fencepost is pulled out as near to vertical as possible. The more off vertical it is pulled the harder it will be to pull out.

  12. #26
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    Jan 2011
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    Far West Wimmera
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacc51 View Post
    Wrap a chain around bottom of post, attach other end of chain to car, tractor, whatever, get a post 1.5m high and place under chain about 300mm away from fencepost, you will need something to hold it in place tonight stop it from toppling over. Jump in vehicle and drive. Fencepost is pulled straight up following the line of least resistance. They come out easy like pulling a popsicle stick out of an icecream.
    This is my recommendation, along with
    Works every time. Forgot to mention the post needs to lent toward the fencepost so the fencepost is pulled out as near to vertical as possible. The more off vertical it is pulled the harder it will be to pull out.
    I have a large lever type 4WD winch. I have used this winch to pull out redgum posts that are over 18in in diameter, tapered outwards underground and 3ft deep using the above method. I used a pallet to support the post sideways. I have built an A-Frame that slots together with a slot for a chain on top. Chain wrapped several times around the post over the A-Frame and connected to the winch cable. This cable is 60ft long so you can get back out of the way. A blanket or similar over the cable to slow it down if anything lets go.

    Dean

  13. #27
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    Sep 2002
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    Have you got a photo of it?
    Cliff.
    If you find a post of mine that is missing a pic that you'd like to see, let me know & I'll see if I can find a copy.

  14. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Oz
    Posts
    530

    Default No pics, sorry. Too long ago.

    Many years ago a workmate and I were trying to remove a rubbish bin holder from the ground in the carpark at work. The bin holder was a piece of 2” water pipe with a couple of flat bars welded to the bottom and encased in concreter. The top half had a couple of rings welded in situ to hold the bin and raise it about 500mm of the deck
    We hooked a length of chain to the bin post, the other end to an Acco 4WD and tried to pull it from the ground. After half a dozen attempts all we managed to do was bend and buckle the the top half of the bin holder, the lower half that was encased in concrete remained steadfast. Whilst we were standing around scratching our heads another workmate came over with a short piece of lumbar, placed the chain over the top, lent the lumbar toward the bin and told us to jump in the Acco and drive off ‘slow and easy’ whilst he held the lumbar in situ. It was like pulling a popsicle stick from an icecream. I reckon a mini minor could have done the job this way, certainly better than using a snatch strap anyway.

  15. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    near Rockhampton
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacc51 View Post
    whilst he held the lumbar in situ.
    Christ, doing that today would have you labelled a terrorist and deported..
    Light red, the colour of choice for the discerning man.

  16. #30
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    Jan 2011
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    Far West Wimmera
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff Rogers View Post
    Have you got a photo of it?
    Photo of what?

    Dean

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