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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Australia
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    1

    Default Sandblasting timber sash windows to remove old paint

    Hi all
    I'm after some information on the procedure to follow to remove old paint from timber windows. I was thinking about sandblasting them, as it's quick and cheap. I need to know what type of sand to use and what grade (I'm thinking a fine sand as it won't damage the timber too much). Also does anyone know how sucessful this method may be. There are to layers of paint on the windows - the top coat looks like a plastic type of green paint - as it can be peeled off in areas, the bottom coat is a clear paint. The windows are about 40 years old.
    Any assistance would be greatfullly appriecated.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    Near Bodgy, AlexS, Wongo & CraigB
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    HI,

    I'd be careful to not damage the timber - if its a soft broad grained timber like Oregon (maybe even cedar) you may find that the timber is damaged enormously. I would be inclined to use a paint-on chemical paint stripper like poly stripper or other brand.... My old man once used a blowtorch to blister the paint off... seemed to work ok except he burnt some timber here and there...
    Zed

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Melbourne - Outer East Foothills
    Posts
    6,792

    Default

    Try a heat guyn first and see how it goes. They are only around $20 at bunnies
    If at first you don't succeed, give something else a go. Life is far too short to waste time trying.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Age
    75
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    Default

    I used a heat gun to very quickly remove flaking paint from the windows and frames of our old house. A 1920's addition has windows made from Western Red Cedar - this timber has hard bits and soft bits in the grain. Care is needed with this timber - the soft bits wear away very quickly with sanding, leaving a very obvious raised grain (like those cheap internal "timber look" doors). Okay if you like the look but, to me, it just looks like a bad paint job.

    Applied Flood's Penetrol to the bare timber and added recommended amount to primer, then undercoat & two coats of gloss enamel. Beautiful!!

    You can't do it all in one weekend but you end up with a good paint job that is going to last.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
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    Definitely a heat gun first. There is also a very good striping product altho slightly expensive, called Peelaway. I wouldn't sand blast for the reasons mentioned and also you may frost the glass in places too. And if it is lead paint underneath then you will blow it everywhere. Best to take care of your family's health, your neighbour's health and the environments health...

    Cheers
    Michael

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
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    91

    Default

    Careful using a heat gun if the paint contains lead (which is likely given the age of the windows). Easiest way I have found to do this is to take them to the local paint strippers where they dip them in a chemical bath to remove all paint.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Kuranda, paradise, North Qld
    Age
    60
    Posts
    5,650

    Default Chemical baths!

    Dipping doors and windows in a bath full of caustic may get the paint off but it will also degrade the timber (turns it grey) and will dissolve the glue in the joints. I've repaired literally hundreds of casement windows and quite a few doors that were treated this way. The joints get loose and the door/window sags and sometimes even drops the bottom rail. Beware!

    Mick
    "If you need a machine today and don't buy it,

    tomorrow you will have paid for it and not have it."

    - Henry Ford 1938

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
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    Mick
    That hasn't been my experience. Maybe it depends on who does it (and what chemicals they use). Attached is a photo of some doors we had done. The only effect was that the glass had to be re-puttied - which wasn't a problem because it needed doing anyay. Certainly didn't turn the timber gray or affect the joints.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Kuranda, paradise, North Qld
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    The ones that I repaired had all been dipped (or rather, soaked) in caustic soda.

    Mick
    Last edited by journeyman Mick; 16th March 2005 at 09:07 PM. Reason: "I" not "O"!
    "If you need a machine today and don't buy it,

    tomorrow you will have paid for it and not have it."

    - Henry Ford 1938

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Australia and France
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    8,182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Theremin
    Mick
    That hasn't been my experience. .
    Theremin,

    I'm guessing you went to "the Strippers" at Woolloongabba, (I only wrote that to show that I could spell Woolloongabba)?

    I've seen tons of stuff they've done, and nothing matches Mick's experience. (a rare disagree with Mick moment!)

    Occasionally some timber will go furry after the waterblasting, but nothing a light sand won't repair.

    The only damage to joints I've seen has been due to paint being removed which once "glued" them together. Remember that painted timber was painted for a reason, firstly to protect the timber, and secondly to cover all the dodgy joinery. The notion of perfect workmanship in the good old days is a romantic myth, look carefully at old hand built stuff and you'll see that as now, the tradesmen were trying to make a quid, and took many short cuts to do that. I've seen window joinery (m&t) where the joints had been bogged with linseed oil putty and left to go hard, and I'm guessing that's the root of the problems Mick is describing.

    Pro Stripping companies have the gear, the experience and the knowledge to do it very economically.

    It's not worth buying the stripper, just get it done!!

    Cheers,

    P

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    South West, WA
    Age
    47
    Posts
    306

    Default

    Ok now that we have the removing of paint explained...

    How do you paint the darn things?

    I have a double sash window.. How do I paint and clean up the rod that the window slides up and down on? (now don't be rude...or is that just me? lol)

    I don't like the idea of removing the window pane to do it...

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