Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Tasmaniac
    Posts
    1,270

    Default Alternative bowl repair.

    Noticed a hairline crack in one of my previously rough turned blackwood bowl blanks. The crack was pretty close to vertical on the rim and went down approx 35mm. It was a nice sized blank about 420mm dia and 125mm deep.
    It seems dovetail/bow tie repairs are an acceptable fix to some however they stick out like dogs britches visually.
    DSCF7711.jpg As in the case of this bowl in King Billy pine.
    Decided to try another way this time with the blackwood bowl.
    First trued up the outside shape and the rim so the bowl would sit flat on the foot and a straight edge could be clamped to the rim.
    DSCF7702.jpg Then cut the crack out using a circular saw against the straight edge.
    DSCF7703.jpg Glued in a suitable piece of blackwood using Kleiberit.303 glue which dries clear and gives a much less noticeable glue line than epoxy glue.
    Then went ahead and turned the bowl as normal.
    Pretty happy with the result. Not easy to spot the repair from a distance.

    DSCF7708.jpg
    A couple of close ups, one from inside and one from outside.
    DSCF7709.jpg DSCF7710.jpg
    Less time consuming than fitting dovetails too.

  2. # ADS
    Google Adsense Advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many





     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Paynesville victoria
    Age
    68
    Posts
    123

    Default

    great save ,,thank you going to try that on a huon pine platter that cracked

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Adelaide Hills, South Australia
    Posts
    3,039

    Default

    Nice job, AB.

    I have sometimes done something a bit similar for decorative purposes, but not as a crack repair.

    Here is another style of crack repair that I have used a bit.


    It is quick and easy. Functionally it stabilises the crack. But, as you can see, I don't try to disguise the 'mend' and, if anything, pick a contrasting wood colour to make it a feature for which I bump up the price. They always sell, so must be getting something right.

    And, another variation using the round peg technique...
    Stay sharp!

    Neil



  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Canterbury UK
    Age
    62
    Posts
    3,449

    Default

    Like Neil I use contrasting woods to repair a natural fault and find the sell better.


    DSCF1229 (768x1024).jpg

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    201

    Default

    I've been thinking about doing crack stabilization that way for a couple years now. Just haven't done it yet.

    I have been drilling across the cracks and inserting dowels that I make to bridge the cracks. If done right, they can be attractive and pretty much secure the cracks from splitting more. . .............. Jerry (in Tucson)USA

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Adelaide Hills, South Australia
    Posts
    3,039

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nubsnstubs View Post

    I have been drilling across the cracks and inserting dowels that I make to bridge the cracks. If done right, they can be attractive and pretty much secure the cracks from splitting more. . .............. Jerry (in Tucson) USA
    Jerry, I find that technique you have been using also produces some nice long oval decorative shapes...


    But, surprisingly, as long as a piece is stabilised (particularly on the rim of bowls), you don't have to disguise its cracks for it to sell (yes it sold and for a good price)....
    Stay sharp!

    Neil



  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Tasmaniac
    Posts
    1,270

    Default

    But, as you can see, I don't try to disguise the 'mend' and, if anything, pick a contrasting wood colour to make it a feature for which I bump up the price. They always sell, so must be getting something right. (NeilS)

    Like Neil I use contrasting woods to repair a natural fault and find the sell better. (Dalboy)

    You guys have it good!. Galleries in this neck of the woods are really reluctant to take bowls that have had any repair done to them. Not sure why that is, perhaps it is because in the past we have been spoiled with so many quality timbers. Times have changed in the "timber availability department". Trees are still there but no one is allowed to cut em down anymore. Perhaps it is time to work on the galleries to change a bit in this regard?.

    For interests sake here is a picture of a bowl repair (from a long time ago) similar to the dowel method shown above. (Back left bowl) Resonably large bowl, Used to get rid of rot more than cracks.
    old bowl repair20190827_08153523.jpg

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Adelaide Hills, South Australia
    Posts
    3,039

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by artful bodger View Post

    You guys have it good!.
    A good thing to be reminded of that.

    I have at least two groups of buyers. One lot are the passing through tourists who want something more than the run of the mill souvenir for whom a crack (mended or not) would be unacceptable. The other group are the regulars who have come back over the decades and they will buy if they particularly like a new piece. That group is where the more challenging pieces go. A subgroup of those are buying gifts for others and what they select will depend to some extent on what they think will be appreciated by the recipient. I have one buyer who travels overseas a lot and regularly buys my pieces to give to her hosts. That is an invaluable customer!

    Quote Originally Posted by artful bodger View Post

    Times have changed in the "timber availability department".
    River red gum used to be relatively plentiful here in SA. Since running out of mallee roots to burn, RRG was used until that also ran out locally and now has to be brought in by the firewood suppliers from the eastern states. With only dead trees on private properties being legally available, and with those also becoming scarce, it has all become very expensive. So, getting a large piece of RRG suitable for turning is a rare event. Even old fence posts are at a premium. Once galleries were a sea of RRG pieces, now gallery owners are asking for them. My forty year old stash of RRG has become an asset...
    Stay sharp!

    Neil



  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    geelong
    Posts
    131

    Default

    Personally I don't mind an honest repair (otherwise the blank woud be scrapped or shrunk down till the fault was gone) However cusomers are not me. have had customers love cracks in bowls before -because the whole cross section of the wood was there (and they understood what happens) At a glance I can't actualy pick out your repair -well done. Only advice is hide it VERY well or be honest with what it is. Honesty has its customers -but they will buy if well hidden too.

Similar Threads

  1. Dovetail repair on King Billy pine bowl.
    By artful bodger in forum WOODTURNING - GENERAL
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 29th Jul 2019, 08:38 AM
  2. Cracked Oak Bowl Repair
    By Dalboy in forum WOODTURNING - GENERAL
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 16th Oct 2018, 08:08 PM
  3. RC toilet bowl copter repair
    By sacc51 in forum METALWORK FORUM
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 14th Apr 2015, 09:56 PM
  4. Bowl Saver Alternative?
    By Scott in forum WOODTURNING - GENERAL
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 8th Aug 2011, 01:40 PM
  5. turning bowl repair
    By coffenup in forum WOODTURNING - GENERAL
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 31st May 2008, 02:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •