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  1. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Aus.
    Age
    66
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    12,661

    Default

    Not Plane Tree? Platanus hybridus?

    Welcome canchippy.

    Coming from a foot man you won't be surprised if I say that no. 2 would have been lifted and looked less squat if you'd added a foot ;-}

    I like no. 3 very much. The finish contrasts work well and the shape flows nicely. The base is well centred between the tips. Wall thickness however appears uneven as far as the photo will allow a good enough view. A nat edge bowl shows this problem up like dogs b*lls.
    Cheers, Ern

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  3. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Welland Ontario Canada
    Posts
    13

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    Hey you guys are pushovers Thanks for all the positive comments.
    London Plane is mentioned in my tree book as being a hybrid of Platanus Occidentalis and Platanus Orientalis whatever the hell that is It is listed under American Sycamore (Platanus Occidentalis) So it would appear to be in the same family. It is also known as Lacewood but I don't think that is the same as Australian Lacewood.
    The trend here with bowls is moving away from feet. More and more bowls are showing up with not even a flat area for stability. The difference in wall thickness is a real problem for me with natural edges and this bowl was perfect until I tried to correct another problem by re-turning

  4. #48
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Coventry UK
    Age
    66
    Posts
    173

    Default

    Opps mistake sorry

  5. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Covington, Virginia USA
    Posts
    76

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rsser View Post
    Coming from a foot man you won't be surprised if I say that no. 2 would have been lifted and looked less squat if you'd added a foot ;-}
    What is the BEST way to turn a foot??
    I have used a faceplate mounted block with a groove cut in to match the size of the lip...most times I "waste" a little on the bottom and cut into the turned piece to make a foot, cut that loose and grab a carving chisel to finish out the rest...Better suggestions??? would like to hear from the professionals
    thanks
    "Too old to be this useful, Way too useful to be this old"

  6. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Aus.
    Age
    66
    Posts
    12,661

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    Quote Originally Posted by canchippy View Post
    London Plane is mentioned in my tree book as being a hybrid of Platanus Occidentalis and Platanus Orientalis whatever the hell that is It is listed under American Sycamore (Platanus Occidentalis) So it would appear to be in the same family. It is also known as Lacewood but I don't think that is the same as Australian Lacewood.
    The trend here with bowls is moving away from feet. More and more bowls are showing up with not even a flat area for stability. The difference in wall thickness is a real problem for me with natural edges and this bowl was perfect until I tried to correct another problem by re-turning
    I had heard that our Plane tree was a hybrid of another plane and a sycamore FWIW.

    ... and trends schmends
    Cheers, Ern

  7. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Towradgi
    Posts
    4,493

    Default More bowls

    Played with the new chuck, Carbatecs Bonham copy, today and turned up these three bowls. Jacaranda, Myrtle and Jarrah Burl. I did try to add some form to the bowls although the first two are still straight sides. The Jarrah burl has a slight bulge. Finish for the first two is Sh#thot wax, the Jarrah Burl is DO brushed on via toothbrush.

    All in all, a fun arvo in the shed. I did learn on thing . . . Do not drop chucks, faceplates etc on foot
    Pat
    Work is a necessary evil to be avoided. Mark Twain

  8. #52
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Coventry UK
    Age
    66
    Posts
    173

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    London Plane sim to beach-light reddish brown straight grained, it becomes known as Lacewood once quarter sawn. LB.

  9. #53
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Beachport, South Oz, the best little town on the planet.
    Age
    68
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pat View Post
    Played with the new chuck, Carbatecs Bonham copy, today and turned up these three bowls. Jacaranda, Myrtle and Jarrah Burl. I did try to add some form to the bowls although the first two are still straight sides. The Jarrah burl has a slight bulge. Finish for the first two is Sh#thot wax, the Jarrah Burl is DO brushed on via toothbrush.

    All in all, a fun arvo in the shed. I did learn on thing . . . Do not drop chucks, faceplates etc on foot

    Pat, Your two straight sided "bowls" I would probably call "dishes" as they are very flat, have a very hard turn from side to bottom, apparently sit straight , plonk, flat on the table and (don't get cranky! please!!!) look somewhat similar to the dishes I feed my dog from.... Your other, rounder bowl is getting to be more like it mate, it still looks pretty heavy too for its' apparent size.
    I would also like to say that it is difficult to give a fair appraisal when the photographs don't show much of the profile, size etc. Perhaps somenoe could suggest some photo techniques for us?

  10. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Towradgi
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    Chris you are right. The first two were the first two made with the new chuck, the third (Jarrah Burl) is were I go a bit of confidence. I will be trying for more "bowl" shape bowls in the future.
    Pat
    Work is a necessary evil to be avoided. Mark Twain

  11. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Aus.
    Age
    66
    Posts
    12,661

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    Leatherwood, 180mm wide.

    Finished with Feast Watson Scandinavian Oil. First use of this stuff; two coats produced a fairly high gloss.

    The wood was rough turned and it dried more eccentric than I've ever seen (and with no checking). Luckily there was enough wall thickness. It's easy to turn and easy to get tear out.

    (Apologies for the photo quality; too fagged to do it properly ..)
    Cheers, Ern

  12. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    melbourne
    Age
    58
    Posts
    587

    Default

    G`day nice job Ern.
    Mick

  13. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Minbun, FNQ, Australia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    12,840

    Default

    G'day Ern, I reckon you could do something to the foot so it wasn't so 'old fashioned'.

    PS. Ya floor needs sweeping.
    Cliff.
    If you find a post of mine that is missing a pic that you'd like to see, let me know & I'll see if I can find a copy.

  14. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Aus.
    Age
    66
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    12,661

    Default

    Thanks Mick.

    Cliff, yep, that's me, old fashioned .

    No, I did have a bit of a cove initially that got lost in the cleaning up. First run of the yew-beaut vacuum port/chuck on the Stubby and it was gently does it.

    What'd you learn at Proserpine?
    Cheers, Ern

  15. #59
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Minbun, FNQ, Australia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    12,840

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rsser View Post
    ...What'd you learn at Proserpine?
    I can't remember.

    I spotted a few more good ideas,
    made some small thin bowls,
    worked out a 'concept' pot with a very nice shape but sanded it too thin in the bottom,
    got some very nice Burdekin Plum,
    got a good work out on some difficult grain in some Sarsaparilla...
    Finished one bit by continually wetting the crook spot that kept tearing out with water & the carefully shear scraping it til it could be sanded without the torn grain showing up, & finished the other bit doing the same thing with a lacquer sanding sealer that set very quickly.

    I'll dig up some photos later.
    Cliff.
    If you find a post of mine that is missing a pic that you'd like to see, let me know & I'll see if I can find a copy.

  16. #60
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Minbun, FNQ, Australia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    12,840

    Default Sarsaparilla practice piece

    96mm x 26mm x 4mm

    Sanded to 400 & finished in Ubeaut Trad Wax.

    The timber came from our land, knocked over by Larry last year.
    The end grain of the sap wood tears out badly but the side grain is beautiful.

    Finished this one by continually wetting the crook grain with water & then carefully shear scraping it.
    As soon as the scrapings stopped coming off as mud, I put more water on it.
    Eventually it could be sanded without the torn grain showing up

    Given more time & a better piece of timber (more heartwood) I would have gone a bit thinner & finished it with DO instead of wax.

    Focus is a bit crook on the side shot.
    Cliff.
    If you find a post of mine that is missing a pic that you'd like to see, let me know & I'll see if I can find a copy.

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