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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Daylesford, Victoria
    Posts
    400

    Question Turning tools, chucks, centers, etc - how to remove/prevent rust?

    Hi,

    I know this may be more of a general hand tools question, but I wanted to ask it specifically of turning tools and attachments (chucks, arbors, centers, etc - even lathe beds).

    I've been gifted/inherited turning tools, lathe, and things from my father so after doing a little bit of turning occasionally and with free time due to a redundancy I thought it's time to get into turning properly now that I finally can.

    My issue is that due to sitting in sheds unused for a few years, some of the tools have surface rust, so I want to refurbish them and hopefully prevent further rust as much as possible. Normally (say for a cast iron bed) I'd attack it with some very fine steel wool and WD-40. But I'm sure there's better methods and products (and don't want tools, etc covered in oil or fine metal filings) - so would like any input on what to use and any methods for giving tools their shine back and improving the look, feel and performance of chucks, arbors, etc. None of it seems deep, just surface rust. I can post some pics tomorrow if needed.

    Thanks in advance and looking forward to actively contributing here rather than just browsing all the great work.

    Darren

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    26,014

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    Quote Originally Posted by TK1 View Post
    Hi,
    I know this may be more of a general hand tools question, but I wanted to ask it specifically of turning tools and attachments (chucks, arbors, centers, etc - even lathe beds).

    I've been gifted/inherited turning tools, lathe, and things from my father so after doing a little bit of turning occasionally and with free time due to a redundancy I thought it's time to get into turning properly now that I finally can.

    My issue is that due to sitting in sheds unused for a few years, some of the tools have surface rust, so I want to refurbish them and hopefully prevent further rust as much as possible. Normally (say for a cast iron bed) I'd attack it with some very fine steel wool and WD-40. But I'm sure there's better methods and products (and don't want tools, etc covered in oil or fine metal filings) - so would like any input on what to use and any methods for giving tools their shine back and improving the look, feel and performance of chucks, arbors, etc. None of it seems deep, just surface rust.
    In this case WD40 and steel wool is as effective as most other things.
    For rust on flat surfaces like lathe beds a razor blade scraper will get things done quickly.
    When you are finished you can just wipe off the rust and WD40.
    Personally I'm a fan of Scotchbrite wheels because they remove rust fast and remove minimal metal

    An effective rust preventative is to use the machinery often but there's also nothing wrong with keeping turning gear lightly oiled - if necessary wipe any excess off before use and restore oil layer every now now and then.

    Exposed steel surfaces don't rust all that quickly in my shed but for small steel items I don't use often, I have started metal bluing (blackening) the surfaces.
    There are a variety of methods from quick paint on blue/black solutions available from places like Caswells, through to traditional (painstakingly) slow fume bluing processionals involving nasty chemicals which is not for everyone, but the results are pretty speckky.

    This is a home made tool post I completed a few weeks back using fume bluing.
    The removable stub is galvanised so only the ends are blued.
    Bluing produces a black oxide layer that is only microns thin so it also works on very close fitting sections like screws threads etc.
    Dec2020.jpg



    This thread in the metal work section outlines the processes I use.
    More metal bluing

    The metal work lathe tool post holder for this small rotary that I use once in a blue moon was done ~9 years ago and its still rust free.
    The larger rotary table holding bracket was also blued/blacked at the same time.


    toolpostjpg3f.jpg

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Townsville. Tropical Nth Qld.
    Posts
    1,074

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    I do a bit like Bob, I have blued some parts, but generally I use Tea oil, (Camelia oil) buy it on the interweb for my Chuck's and all centre's etc. For the bedways I have found Lanotec spray is the best here in the tropics.
    Rgds,
    Crocy.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    3,952

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    If you do not wish to go to trouble of bluing etc. just wipe all the bare metal with a oily rag, this has been a tried a true procedure for as long as there has been metal and rust.


    Bob that tool post looks suspiciously like it is for metal spinning

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    26,014

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    PHP Code:
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    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    If you do not wish to go to trouble of bluing etc. just wipe all the bare metal with a oily rag, this has been a tried a true procedure for as long as there has been metal and rust.


    Bob that tool post looks suspiciously like it is for metal spinning
    It is

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Mareeba Far Nth Qld
    Age
    81
    Posts
    2,975

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    I used a nugget shoe polish tin filled with a tightly packed with a strip of an old blanket, it is then filled with a mix of kerosene and a light oil. The blanket strip sticks up slightly above rim so that the lid still fits on. The tin I have at present is about sixty years old, is still functioning. Very effective for prevention but will only attend to very light surface rust only.

    Jim
    Sometimes in the daily challenges that life gives us, we miss what is really important...

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Daylesford, Victoria
    Posts
    400

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    Thanks all for the replies. Looks like it's steel wool/scotchbrite pads, WD40 and elbow grease then! Just wanted to check I wasn't missing a secret preventative technique )

    I will definitely be using them more often now that I'm getting into it, they sat unused for a few year's at my fathers and then last year at my place. Shed is dry so hopefully a good clean, regular use and the odd wipe with oil will keep them like new.

    I d like the idea of bluing them - I've done brass blackening for model ship cannons but might have to give bluing a go on a few tools.

    Thanks,
    Darren

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