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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Melbourne
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    174

    Default Pepper grinder mechanism recommendation

    I'm looking at turning a pepper grinder from some blackwood or possibly myrtle - depends on what I can find in my stash.

    Does anyone have recommendations on the mechanism? I tried a search but the threads I found were at least 5years old

    Carbatec have two styles, one is $28 compared to $13. I'm happy spending the cash if it's better. Or if there are any other brands up for recommendation.

    $13 - Ceramic Salt/Pepper Mechanism - 10" | Salt & Pepper Mills - Carbatec

    $28 - Easigrind Easy fit Salt/Pepper Mill Mechanism | Salt & Pepper Mills - Carbatec

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    East Warburton, Vic
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    1,403

    Default

    I use Crushgrind, available from Carroll’s

    CWS Store - Crushgrind 260mm Ceramic Pepper Mill
    Cheers

    DJ

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Wentworth Falls, NSW
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    88

    Default

    I think the Easygrind is a knock-off version of the Crushgrind and I think I saw that they are a copy of an older style, meaning that the current Crushgrind would be more expensive, but probably more advanced.

    As far as recommendations go, I have not used the Carbatec products. You can get basic peper grinder kits for under $10 from several online providers. If you search for woodturning supplies in Australia you will turn up a few. I have bought from Carrolls (cwsonline.com.au) and Timberbits (timberbits.com.au), but there are others around the country.

    The basic mills are usually stainless steel and they are perfectly OK for pepper grinders. Ceramic mills are a bit better and will also stand up to salt. These basic mills ate pretty easy to fit as the components usually fit into recesses in the turning with a couple of small screws. I recently renovated a standard style grinder that has been in constant use for over 30 years - just needed a good clean. These older mechanisms were all European - I have seen France, Italy and Germany. (The cheaper Asian knock-offs might not be as good though)

    The Crushgrind style are higher quality mechanisms and the Crushgrind brand comes with an impressive guarantee for longevity. But they are more expensive and in my experience require more skill to turn the body and fit the mechanism. They require an internal recess into which the mechanism locks. The ones I have used are also a larger grinder than the more traditional style.

    So my recommendation? I would probably say stick to a traditional style for the first attempt, maybe not with your most precious wood? I would only go down the Crushgrind/Easygrind path if you want a larger grinder or an heirloom piece.

    Some of the kits are specific for salt or pepper and come with a 'P' or 'S' on the cap. I think the ceramic mechanisms from Timberbits may be branded 'S' for salt, so that would be worth checking if you want it for pepper. Also, the sizes of the recesses are kit-specific, so the stainless kit may not fit into the ceramic recesses and vice-versa.

    Bruce

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Nerang Queensland
    Age
    62
    Posts
    10,620

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Acco View Post
    I use Crushgrind, available from Carroll’s

    CWS Store - Crushgrind 260mm Ceramic Pepper Mill
    +1, the only ones to use


    Quote Originally Posted by bruceward51 View Post
    I think the Easygrind is a knock-off version of the Crushgrind and I think I saw that they are a copy of an older style, meaning that the current Crushgrind would be more expensive, but probably more advanced.

    As far as recommendations go, I have not used the Carbatec products. You can get basic peper grinder kits for under $10 from several online providers. If you search for woodturning supplies in Australia you will turn up a few. I have bought from Carrolls (cwsonline.com.au) and Timberbits (timberbits.com.au), but there are others around the country.

    The basic mills are usually stainless steel and they are perfectly OK for pepper grinders. Ceramic mills are a bit better and will also stand up to salt. These basic mills ate pretty easy to fit as the components usually fit into recesses in the turning with a couple of small screws. I recently renovated a standard style grinder that has been in constant use for over 30 years - just needed a good clean. These older mechanisms were all European - I have seen France, Italy and Germany. (The cheaper Asian knock-offs might not be as good though)

    The Crushgrind style are higher quality mechanisms and the Crushgrind brand comes with an impressive guarantee for longevity. But they are more expensive and in my experience require more skill to turn the body and fit the mechanism. They require an internal recess into which the mechanism locks. The ones I have used are also a larger grinder than the more traditional style.

    So my recommendation? I would probably say stick to a traditional style for the first attempt, maybe not with your most precious wood? I would only go down the Crushgrind/Easygrind path if you want a larger grinder or an heirloom piece.

    Some of the kits are specific for salt or pepper and come with a 'P' or 'S' on the cap. I think the ceramic mechanisms from Timberbits may be branded 'S' for salt, so that would be worth checking if you want it for pepper. Also, the sizes of the recesses are kit-specific, so the stainless kit may not fit into the ceramic recesses and vice-versa.

    Bruce
    Actually the Crushgrinds are cheaper than the knock-off's, weird but I think it is more about where they are sold
    Neil
    ____________________________________________
    Every day presents an opportunity to learn something new

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    3,350

    Default

    As said above Crushgrind is the way to go "proven quality over many years"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Burwood NSW
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    78
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    1,153

    Default

    TasmanianTurning Supplies have salt and pepper grinders for sale at $5.20 each . Both with ceramic mechanisms .I have'nt tried them but have some on order .
    Ted

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    174

    Default

    Looks like the Crushgrind is the way to go. I'm happy to go straight for the quality bit. Thanks for that.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Port Sorell, Tasmania
    Posts
    370

    Default

    I am a big fan of crushgrind, as are family and friends I have given pepper grinders to. I ground an old metal file to cut the internal recess, otherwise you can buy a purpose made tool.
    Tony
    You can't use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have. ~Oscar Wilde

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    shoalhaven n.s.w
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    1,210

    Default

    Another good ceramic mechanism are the crank handle mini grinders from pops shed, only down side was getting the imperial drill bits.
    Crush grind are great too and the woodcut mill is also a time saver
    Turning round since 1992

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    AU
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Looks like one of these (Robert Sorby Crushgrind Relief Cutting Tool) may come in handy for the crushgrind to cut a groove for the clips to slot into. Is their another suggested way to do this or do I need the tool?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Wentworth Falls, NSW
    Posts
    88

    Default

    Probably a good idea if you are not into making tools and intend to make a few grinders. There used to be plans available for what in my opinion was a better design but the site has been removed I think. It also had provision for correct spacing of the groove in the lid.

    I fiddled led with a tool made from an Allen key but it was less than ideal and getting the groove positioned properly was a problem.

    Bruce

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    McBride BC Canada
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    3,358

    Default

    I collect salts from all over the world. Not just for show, I use them in my kitchen and on my table.

    Grinders are OK for peppercorns but I gave up on the lot of them for salt.
    Some salts are hygroscopic and bunged up the cutters for a real mess.

    So, I found a source of shallow mortar and pestle. I can crush a pinch or more with perfect ease.

  13. #13
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    Apr 2005
    Location
    Nerang Queensland
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gop View Post
    Looks like one of these (Robert Sorby Crushgrind Relief Cutting Tool) may come in handy for the crushgrind to cut a groove for the clips to slot into. Is their another suggested way to do this or do I need the tool?
    NO, absolute waste of money IMHO. I always epoxy in my mechanisms and never use a recess. I also check the size of the openings and cut off the ribs if necessary, may be fine on softwoods but nothing worse than a fit so tight it splits out Aussie hardwood timbers.
    Neil
    ____________________________________________
    Every day presents an opportunity to learn something new

  14. #14
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    May 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dai sensei View Post
    NO, absolute waste of money IMHO. I always epoxy in my mechanisms and never use a recess. I also check the size of the openings and cut off the ribs if necessary, may be fine on softwoods but nothing worse than a fit so tight it splits out Aussie hardwood timbers.
    Just to be clear, you're suggesting to not buy the recess tool? Is it's purpose to help hold the mechanism in place? I'm happy not to spend $55 on a one or two time use tool.

    I've been watching this video and he doesn't use one. Just some epoxy to hold it in. YouTube

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by lewisc View Post
    Just to be clear, you're suggesting to not buy the recess tool? Is it's purpose to help hold the mechanism in place? I'm happy not to spend $55 on a one or two time use tool.

    I've been watching this video and he doesn't use one. Just some epoxy to hold it in. YouTube
    Yes exactly. I glue mine in and sand off the recess luggs. I even cut off the the small splines/ribs
    Neil
    ____________________________________________
    Every day presents an opportunity to learn something new

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