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  1. #1
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    Default how to make these (simple looking) business card holders

    Sorry for another "how do I do this" post, but HOW DO I DO THIS?


    They have a cut-out, which I presume is done with a flat router bit.
    2013-07-14 13.05.24.jpg

    I would like to create one of these for my desk at work (I love supporting the wood gallery and own several pieces that I have purchased from Bungendore Woodworks, but I would like to set this as a personal challenge to create one for myself).

    I am wondering what you good folk would recommend as the safest process for doing this.

    Here are the various options I can think of:
    OPTION 1
    - on flat square timber, use router to create recess along the full length of the timber
    - turn between centres but not mounted below the centre. Can't mount in centre, because the centre would be cut out by the router.
    - this might then lead it to be turned to create the shape shown above, without extra cutting to flatten the base.
    problem = turning and sanding after routing the cutout might lead to chips, or at least an over-rounding when sanding.

    OPTION 2
    - turn a cylinder and sand & polish.
    - use a bandsaw with a guide to cut off the base.
    - rout the cutout in the centre
    problem = how to rout the cut-out, when the shape will be round rather than flat? I can't think of how to keep the router flat while using the router in free-hand mode or keep the timber flat when the router is mounted in a router table.


    OPTION 3
    - Turn, sand and polish a cylinder from a square of wood (between centres), but leave both ends of the timber as squares (to be removed later) - see below:
    2013-07-19 11.57.02.jpg
    - use a bandsaw with a guide to cut off the base - this would be easier than in option 2 because the ends provide a square to sit flat on the bandsaw table
    - rout the cutout in the centre using a router table - this would be easier than option 2 because it provides the ends provide a flat surface to rout from
    - by hand, remove the squares using a saw/blade.
    problem = Since the router cut will go beyond centre, I believe that the router bit would need to be smaller than the joining sections between squares and cylinder. yes?

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  3. #2
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    Default

    A variation of Option 2:
    Turn the cylinder, sand and polish.
    To turn sand and polish the domed ends, wrap with tape for protection, and grip in pin jaws.
    Belt sander safer than bandsaw for shaping the flat, just takes longer.
    Hot-melt glue the flat to a piece of plywood. Attach the plywood to two planks to form a bridge on the router table.
    Rout the slot.
    Bake to remove the hot melt glue, and clean up with acetone.

    Cheers,
    Joe
    Of course truth is stranger than fiction.
    Fiction has to make sense. - Mark Twain

  4. #3
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    Thanks Joe.
    I like that idea, and certainly sounds safer for the routing.

    I only have 50mm jaws, and 25mm jaws, so in my chuck I can grip things smaller than 31mm round or larger than 50mm round. So for one of these (about 40mm diameter) I think I still would need to turn it using a design like in the diagram above at option 3. But then following your plan. It wouldn't really be an issue for polishing the very small section after cutting the tenon - since it would be routed off anyway.

  5. #4
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    Does it have to be from solid timber? You could turn a cylinder, cut in half and sand cut faces, then glue in extra smaller flat piece in between and sand base flat to finish. Simple oil and buff finish would then do.
    Neil
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  6. #5
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    does it have to be turned?

    Left field option

    take a square piece of wood, cut the recess down the middle with router bit
    round the corners with a roundover bit
    finish the roundover on a disk sander
    I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.

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  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dai sensei View Post
    Does it have to be from solid timber? You could turn a cylinder, cut in half and sand cut faces, then glue in extra smaller flat piece in between and sand base flat to finish. Simple oil and buff finish would then do.
    I hadn't considered this but definitely an option. Not how this one was made, but could work fine for another one.

  8. #7
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    I will have a at this I would turn 2 at a time! work out how long with waste, and have dressed Timber pre rout the groove then pop a tight fitting peice of craftwood in groove, Mark off Centre to leave a flat bottom, turn sand and polish then cut the waste off sand and polish ends! and don't forget to remove craft wood! done!
    that's what I came up with!
    you should be able to get a router bit the same size as the craft wood and this would help minimize break out on the groove, also in its a snug fit no need to glue it in!
    Last edited by chuck1; 20th Jul 2013 at 08:06 AM. Reason: bit more info

  9. #8
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    I'm with Gra on this - it looks like the basic stock has been made on a router table - centre slot milled followed by the 4 corners being milled with a roundover bit and fence. Use an extra long stick and leave square bits at the ends to keep the stick aligned, then cut off to length. The ends could also be rounded with the same roundover bit (but you would want to make a solid holding fixture or order extra fingers from the micro-surgeon) or sanded as Gra suggested.

    Luckily I have an enormous roundover bit - ~22.5mm radius CMT - that I bought to make cylindrical stool legs.

  10. #9
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    Hey mate
    I would make the flat base by getting the turning block and glue a second piece on the bottom with a piece of paper between the two pieces and that gives you a blank to turn. Then when you are finished you separate the two pieces with a chisel as the paper makes a week joint.
    The groove in the top I would make a simple jig to hold it in and use a router to do the trench to hold the cards
    Regards michael
    enjoy life we are only here a short time not a long time

  11. #10
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    You are making only one? I have used auto body filler for many jigs in the shop. I think this would be a good application for it. Create and finish the cylinder with the rounded ends. Wrap tightly in one layer of plastic cling wrap. Almost fully bed the part in body filler in a prepared piece of wood stock. It would resemble something like filling a large rectangular cut out in a piece of waste with the filler and the piece to be cut. Use a dado blade to cut the notch. Trim the flat area with a regular blade. While embedded sand the bottom if you wish to make it smooth and then peel away the "holder" to remove your piece.

  12. #11
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    Hi guys,Captn Eddie has a easy looking project for Business Card Holders,check it out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4o1zt8jtPE

    Mick!!!

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck1 View Post
    I will have a at this I would turn 2 at a time! work out how long with waste, and have dressed Timber pre rout the groove then pop a tight fitting peice of craftwood in groove, Mark off Centre to leave a flat bottom, turn sand and polish then cut the waste off sand and polish ends! and don't forget to remove craft wood! done!
    that's what I came up with!
    you should be able to get a router bit the same size as the craft wood and this would help minimize break out on the groove, also in its a snug fit no need to glue it in!
    You might need to glue the wood n the slot. Can see it flying out into the face shield.

    I'd route long sticks like Gra suggested. Put in pin jaws to sand and part off rounding end over. put in other way around to sand other end.

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  14. #13
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    here is one I tried out today, straight off the tool (didn't even sand). I turned it off centre, then mounted the turned piece in the droll vice and cut the groove with the SCMS. Seems to work, the ends need to be cleaned up, you could probably clean it up with a disk sander or if you were more talented with the scew

    MyAttempt.jpg
    I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.

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  15. #14
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    Thanks gra looks great. SCMS with the depth gauge sounds a bit safer to me than a router (that thing scares the hell out of me).

    What sort of vice did you use? I actually don't own one but have been thinking about getting one.

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bassmansimon View Post
    Thanks gra looks great. SCMS with the depth gauge sounds a bit safer to me than a router (that thing scares the hell out of me).

    What sort of vice did you use? I actually don't own one but have been thinking about getting one.
    standard steel drill press vice. Nothing special. I have also done a bigger one out of Silky oak (having trouble with th pics, will upload tonight. That will hold letters.

    It was doe as follows

    * turned round
    * Curved the ends
    * mounted the SCMS using the drill press vice with a sacrificial piece
    *cut a flat using the SCMS
    * Turned 180 degrees and cut the slot with the stopped SCMS
    I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.

    My Other Toys

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