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  1. #1
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    Post Double glazed windows???

    Good people. Have any of you lot seen or heard of a way us mere mortals can be making double glazed windows? Needs to be in timber frames, matches the current decore!!!
    It's the adding nitrogen or argon bit that i'm not totally sure on how to do. I mean, using silicon in the joints et cetera to make a gas seal is ok.. Just hoping for some first hand info... Any help greatly appreciated... Y'know the story...
    Ahh, Hon'.. you promised to build the new windows two years ago!!!!!
    Thanks in advance
    roj

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  3. #2
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    Drop Bear Capital of Gippsland (Lang Lang) Vic Australia
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    Talking

    Don't know about the gassing but I am aware that you have to use two different thicknesses of glass if you want sound insulation, if you don't the inner pane becomes a passive transducer and the outside noise levels will carry straight through.
    Stupidity kills. Absolute stupidity kills absolutely.

  4. #3
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    Oct 1999
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    Bredbo, NSW, Australia
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    Post

    Hi Roger
    As far as I'm aware not all windows are gassed. The Pella range from the US are but a number of local manufacturers just whack em together. Believe with the gas they are a better product but I'm sceptical as to how long it can be contained. An important factor too apparently is the space between the glass. It varies depending on whether or not the purpose is for sound or noise insulation or a combination of both. Get some specs on the Pella stuff from Stegbar and see what they say.
    Good Luck
    Shaun.
    PS Double glazed windows should be a standard feature in Aussie homes given our climate.

  5. #4
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    Tooradin,Victoria,Australia
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    Post

    Gooday Roger.

    Try this site for info.
    http://www.savenergy.org/dglazd.htm

    Or go to http://www.ask.com/

    and ask about double glazing. Hope this helps.



    ------------------
    Ian () Robertson
    "We do good turns every day"

  6. #5
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    Jun 2000
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    Post

    Thanks Guys..
    Iain i wonder which pane is the thicker, inside or outside???

  7. #6
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    Post

    Roger as far as I know the argon or nitrogen are not there because they have any insulating properties (remember air is 80% nitrogen) but rather they are put there as a dry gas to ensure there is no condensation on the inside of the panes. I have seen some double glazing where they simply seal 2 panes of glass with a little silica gel in the bottom of the pane. This effectively scavenges any moisture that may be inside the double glazing panes and keeps them fog free.
    Is your interest in double glazing because of the insulating properties or their acoustic properties?
    Cheers,
    Peter

  8. #7
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    Post

    I am not sure but logic would dictate that the thicker one would be on the inside as it is less likely to be influenced by the thinner one, however, if you are fascinated by the delicate art of domestic violence the opposite could apply so as not to entertain the neighbours
    Stupidity kills. Absolute stupidity kills absolutely.

  9. #8
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    Jun 2000
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    Alphington Vic Australia
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    Post

    Thanks folks. Why does double glazing seem a viable option? My windows need replacing.... i live opposite a railway line and.... the noise is a pain so... me thinks.. double glaze for both noise and climate insulation.
    I understand the reason behind the dry gas being used to prevent condensation between the panes. When i last travelled to Europe i noticed that most houses had double glazed windows and doors. Half of these were with the gas, the other with silica gel... both seemed to work sort of ok. really cold weather still fogged the windows out. It seems that in writing this i have come up with the method i will use... the easiest.

    Thanks for the input guys.. keep 'em coming.
    roj

  10. #9
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    Post

    Roger, I noticed that one of the sites had information on low emmisivity glass as a part of the double glazing system. If you are making your own you may want to use a low emmisivity glass as a part of the system. The use of low emmissivity glass means that in summer it let's less heat in and in winter it radiates less heat to the atmosphere.

    One form of low emmisivity glass is Indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. I think it is available in OZ and (I'm not absolutely positive here) I think that some of the low glare glass is actually ITO coated.
    I have included a link to a paper I found on the internet that may interest you.
    http://www.mech.bee.qut.edu.au/rcmt/...-1/jmb96-1.htm

    Hope this helps,
    Peter

  11. #10
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    Post

    there is an alternative to double glazing.i am not sure if it would suit you but here we go.i work in a window factory and a lot of people are going for laminated glass that is 2 sheets of 3mm glass separated by a plastic film and a rubber seal all round .it is cheaper thn dbl glazing and not as much trouble.you can also order it in different thicknesses people renovating are replacing laminated glass in old good condition windows as an alternative to replacing the whole lot. it has good insulation properties and cuts down on noise as well . there is glass on the market now called comfort tone which is slightly tinted it cuts the glare and uv rays which is becoming very popular hope this is of some help dave

  12. #11
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    Post

    Thanks a lot for the helpful input folks..
    Muchly appreciated.
    roj

  13. #12
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    Default

    Double glazed windows are frames fitted with two panes of glass that have a space between them, usually 12mm to 16mm. The gap between the two glass panes stays in place thanks to a spacer bar. Typically, this gap is filled with normal air, but it can also be filled with argon gas.
    This method of double glazing is also called insulated glazing because of the ability to trap the air between the panes glass which leads to dramatic reductions of heat and noise transmissions.
    Hence, the more layers of glass the window is built with, the higher the reduction is going to be. However, the glazing method is not limited to only two layers of glass, triple glazing is also available for even more optimal results. Thus, no matter how good of a heating system you rely on to warm your house, it is useless if most of the heat is lost through a single-pane window.
    Try this site for info.
    پنجره دوجداره

  14. #13
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    Default

    Often the plastic spacer strip between the two panes of glass is a hollow porous tube filled with silica gel. This is there to stop the condensation on the glass but even if the glass envelope is sealed at manufacture it will, due to the constant expansion and contraction, develop leaks and with time moisture will get in and overpower the gel's ability to absorb it.

    The European experience is that this takes about 10 years.

    Once the gel is saturated the cheapest option is to replace the glass envelope.

    I double glazed my own windows and decided to fit small pockets of gel in the frame so that when it is saturated it can be easily removed and refreshed without having to dismantle the whole window. The windows are not sealed but as the gel can be easily refreshed that doesn't matter.

    I looked at using the special coated glass but the small improvement in performance over the huge cost increase made my mind up for me.

  15. #14
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    Default

    So...uhhh....you know this thread is 17 years old, right?

  16. #15
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    Default

    So...uhhh....you know this thread is 17 years old, right?
    Nothing wrong with a more modern look at an old subject.

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