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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Sydney Upper North Shore
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    When Iím using normal shellac I do as you do.
    However, when reading up on hard shellac on ubeatís site, it mentions problems with the brushes or rubbers setting hard when using hard shellac. As you mentioned you used hard shellac on this box top veneer, I was just wondering how you stopped your rubber setting hard between jobs.
    Cheers

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Melbourne
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    534

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    Hi Lappa,

    Hard shellac acts like other shellac in the first instance, i.e. it dries very quickly and your brushes, rags, rubbers will harden in minutes if left exposed to the air. This is because the methylated spirits evaporates, leaving just the shellac behind. Hard shellac acts exactly like this in the short term, however, after about three weeks the cross-linking agent added during preparation starts to kick in. If your brush dries out in the short term you can reactivate it with methylated spirits. If your rubber dries out throw it away - it’s only rags.

    Provided you keep your hard shellac rubber moist (not wet) in an airtight container where it cannot dry out it will last for ages. Mine certainly do. It is when you let it get dry the problems begin. As to brushes, I use a polishers mop which is very expensive so I wouldn’t ever leave this without cleaning immediately after use.

    I do know someone who just leaves his (ordinary shellac) polishing mop in a jar of meths with the handle poking through the top of the lid. Claims he has never cleaned the brush in years. He’s a qualified furniture restorer and I’m constantly surprised how laid back he is about things we have been taught are ‘rules’.

    Best regards,

    Brian

  4. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Melbourne
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    534

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    Apologies to those whoíve followed along this far. A bit of a delay as the love of my life has been bedridden with back pain for the past 3+ weeks so Iíve been distracted by other things.


    OK, a big push to the finish.

    Having fitted the hinges it is time to think about the internals of the box. After much thought I decided to go with simplicity. The box is slightly too small to be what I think of as a jewellery box so it will be a keepsake box. No trays, no lock.

    Normally I use green or tan suede for lining, but somehow this box called for something different. I decided to use lavender ultrasuede. Iíve fallen in love with ultrasuede/alcantara which is a synthetic suede. Donít get the idea this is cheap, though - it is far more expensive than real suede. It has the benefit of being extremely hard wearing and, unlike suede, it does not contain tannins that tarnish silver.

    I use 1mm white art board from Eckersleys Art Supplies as the base. I use double sided tape to fix the ultrasuede to the card and the card to the box.


    C7289881-4C75-46D4-B888-0E6833265A00.jpeg


    One of the advantages of suede or ultrasuede over velvet or faux suede is that it is not woven. As a result the material can be cut without the edges fraying, so in the main it isnít necessary to fold over every edge, just the visible edges. To these edges I add a little white PVA glue to ensure a good bond between box and lining.

    EF646F45-8176-4E37-B206-6EA7E49DBC11.jpeg



    Lining done, we are very close to the finish. It only remains to give the french polish a final shine with Festool Speed Gloss blue and a couple of coats of Liberon Black Bison Neutral paste wax:

    3AACD9A6-3829-4AD1-8FF0-9485B7D11D9A.jpeg

    Box complete. Macassar ebony over American Black Walnut. Hard shellac by U-beaut, Black Bison wax by Liberon, smartHinge by Andrew Crawford and blue Speed Gloss by Festool.

    Itís a challenge to photograph this box due to its high-gloss finish. Reflections look like flaws in the box. Still, here it is:

    77198A5E-CA13-491A-9096-4969B4A963F7.jpg

    5EDC02A1-97A5-4E51-8BA6-082FA812C0FB.jpeg

    88C0AFCA-A352-4CAB-84DC-EE1A70A909B9.jpeg



    947DBAE2-B23C-434E-BD30-A053DC563669.jpeg


    Thanks to everyone who came along on the journey. Iím happy with the result of the build although if Iíd had more veneer Iíd have preferred a bigger box which would have justified a lock and a tray. Next time.

    Thanks, too, to Andrew Crawford who taught me how to get that extra shine on french polish.


    Comments, suggestions, thoughts welcome.


    Back to the woodpile.


    Brian

  5. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Warragul Vic
    Posts
    871

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    Bloody FANTASTIC is all I can say. I have enjoyed the ride and the destination.

    Thank You ... its been worth it.

    Euge

  6. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Auckland New Zealand
    Posts
    140

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    I absolutely love it Brian. One day I hope to achieve a shine similar to the one on this box.

    Lovely work [emoji106]

  7. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Leopold, Victoria
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    61
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    3,288

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    As others have said, the finished product looks fantastic. You say the gloss makes it look like there are faults but I certainly can't see any so it must be you being over critical of your own work.
    I am interested in the Festool blue speed gloss. What is it as I have never heard of it.
    Cheers,
    Dallas

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    534

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    Thanks, guys - I really appreciate it.

    Dallas - Festool Speed Gloss is part of Festool’s polishing range. They are similar to ‘cut and polish’ for a car. Essentially a cream with fine abrasive in it. Orange is the starting point, then blue, then white, the abrasive becoming finer as you go. I know there are people who use car products such as Meguire’s for this but I suspect it depends on what type of surface is being polished. I’ve never had any luck polishing shellac with auto products. Come to that I haven’t been able to master final polishing with talc or rottenstone, i.e. the traditional way. Something else to learn!

    The shellac gave a finish more than good enough for a jewellery box but I wanted to give it a little extra. As it is, stopping at the blue product has given a very high gloss. Probably impractical for a jewellery box as it shows up every fingerprint, but looks good on a coffee table

    Best,

    Brian

  9. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,244

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    Brian, another beaut box there!! I used to love nothing but gloss, but then found the beauty of satins and oil finishes, but there on occasions the call for gloss, this sir is one of those times. Fantastic.
    Hopefully SWMBO is ok and up and about. Back pain is nasty, I get my fair share of that.
    Richard

  10. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Location
    Westleigh, Sydney
    Age
    73
    Posts
    8,781

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    Great result! I don't usually go for a gloss finish, but that looks terrific on those timbers.
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