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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    Canberra
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    Default Circle Jig - Router - so simple its OBSCENE

    You know, I've cut hundreds of circles for wheels while I was making carts.

    I came up with and used at least ten different ways to do the job.

    THEN I see this idea.

    Blew me AWAY.

    Made a circle cutting jig for the router table today! Very simple and very effective. : woodworking

    Its so obvious, so elegant, so useful and so intuitive I had to share.
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  3. #2
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    Sep 2016
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    Bentleigh East
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    Default

    I think I've seen it somewhere before, it does seem great on paper. In practice I've never had any luck doing this to plywood without massive kick back. Must be the router bit, really needs a spiral bit doesn't it?

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
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    Newcastle
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  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Redlands area, Brisbane
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spyro View Post
    I think I've seen it somewhere before, it does seem great on paper. In practice I've never had any luck doing this to plywood without massive kick back. Must be the router bit, really needs a spiral bit doesn't it?
    It does require a bearing on the router bit. I suppose solid carbide bits with end bearings are around; but I've never seen one.

  6. #5
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    Sep 2016
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by markharrison View Post
    It does require a bearing on the router bit. I suppose solid carbide bits with end bearings are around; but I've never seen one.
    nah that didn't help me, it kept catching (and I kept pushing of course, because I'm an idiot)

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Brisbane
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    1,722

    Default

    Here are a couple of versions of solid carbide pattern following bits that I use for particular purposes.
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    There ain't no devil, it's just god when he's drunk!!

    Tom Waits

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    melbourne australia
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    1,920

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spyro View Post
    In practice I've never had any luck doing this to plywood without massive kick back.
    Sounds like you rough cut the circle too large. You shouldn't be getting any kickback. Even a blunt straight-flute bit shouldn't kick back if you're doing it right. It will just make you work harder and burn the wood.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Somerville
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    47
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    169

    Default

    Related question - what's a good couple of spiral/compression bits to have in the inventory? I don't own any - all my pattern and straight bits are straight cut. What is the "right" bit for cutting dadoes, rabbets and grooves in a router table? I assume an upcut bit, since it will clear waste down towards the router and DE - but I understand that will cause more tearout on the face? I barely use handheld router, too scary.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    715

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lyricnz View Post
    Related question - what's a good couple of spiral/compression bits to have in the inventory? I don't own any - all my pattern and straight bits are straight cut. What is the "right" bit for cutting dadoes, rabbets and grooves in a router table? I assume an upcut bit, since it will clear waste down towards the router and DE - but I understand that will cause more tearout on the face? I barely use handheld router, too scary.
    For dados and similar grooves you'd want a downcut so that you end up with a clean top face of your work. The upcut will cause tearout on the face you're cutting. For a through cut, a compression bit is best (upcut changing to downcut along the length), so tearout on both the top and bottom faces is reduced.

    Timbecon torquata bits are reasonable - I have a few. Amanatool are great - carbitec now stock them.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    3,159

    Default Not Impressed

    I was not in the least impressed by this "methodology".

    Two bearing surfaces - the central spindle and the router bearing - on either end of a light batten aligned by hand with 1800+ watts of spinning router blade. It seems inherently unstable, and his circle looks rather rough.

    Another accident in progress.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernmc View Post
    That's the one I made a few years ago! So simple and works so well.

    Jane

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