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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sydney
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    60

    Default Domino wannabe & Mortise Jig

    I saw a jig on facebook marketplace and got half way through buying it when I realised it was probably too cheap to be true.
    (Tianli router jig will find it if curious)
    It was advertising at $50 on fb, after a bit of website checking and searching for the real thing in other markets it retails more like $200.
    Not a risk I was willing to take, though I may still take a plunge on a legit source down the track.
    Tianli.jpg
    I am however a little obsessed with my cordless trimmer router and loved the thought of doing something similar, it already has a plunge base which operates better than most but comes with a really crappy edge guide.
    Below are the photos of where I am up to - I will give it a test drive later today.
    In for a penny in for a pound I decided I could keep going and run a few jigs off the one idea - total cost around $45 for all three and rods - the screws I already had.
    If you want to make similar
    - 8mm stainless rods (I'm against all things that rust easily where I can avoid it)
    - 25mm square Al for the rod block slides - I made them a little oversize to fit my other router as well and yes they could be trimmed down (second set of holes in pic)
    - 100 x 6mm angle Al for the guides (I may make a corner reinforcement for the big one - Al fences do bend if dropped
    Tooling; drill press, hack saw, cordless drill for tapping (I am lazy and the cordless does an excellent job if you are not heavy handed)
    I did cheat and used a vertical mill to clean up the throat of the bigger one but you can get by without.
    I'm happy to draw up plans if anyone is interested but it isn't brain surgery.
    Still need to add a front handle and buy some screw knobs for locking to the rods

    Domino.jpg
    MortiseJig.jpg

    Well - the first test worked a treat - the reason I went down this rabbit hole was a pesky break in one of our parker era dining chairs.
    The tenon was snapped and more or less needed a domino type tenon replacement.
    The guide edge served as the platform from the bench top and the fence plates kept the piece centred, made a tricky job easy.
    Before.jpg

    Drawings for others are always problematic - too much too little??
    The basics are here - the holes in the throat are 4mm by design, this gives a centre reference and the edges for an 8mm cutter
    Domino Plate Drawing .pdf

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Dungog
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    Default

    Well done, simple things are often the best.
    Plans , yes please.
    Again thanks and simply the best. ��

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Woodstock (Cowra)
    Age
    73
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    3,145

    Default

    +1 for plans please
    Would you consider making it to sell, I have a very strong feeling that your on a winner here
    The person who never made a mistake never made anything

    Cheers
    Ray

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Campbelltown NSW
    Age
    76
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    299

    Default

    Clever thinking. That design makes me think that the angle and block could be made as one part on the 3D printer. Locking the steel rods securely could be tricky but achievable I think.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sydney
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    60

    Default

    Last time I 3d printed anything near this size it took forever and warped a lot and also provided a few bird nests, good luck
    I can add the diagonal ribs and send an stl file if you are that crazy - the threads would probably be better as a captured nut, I can envisage it but you can draw it

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sydney
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    Honestly - I'd rather share the plans, share the love.
    To monetise this would be a chore.
    It's probably more than a few hours all told, on a small scale I'd be charging between 200-300 before it would be worthwhile, I don't think the market would bear that when you can make your own with a drill press and $45 material. Pay a few more dollars and the Al seller will do all the length cutting (I do have access to a cold saw which sped things up immensely)
    If you do make your own, accuracy is everything but there is a simple cheat - clamp parts together, drill through at 5mm, separate parts then tap the square bar, drill angle out to 6mm and countersink. The holes could be anywhere and it will still align correctly together. The same can't be said for the slide holes - these were a pain.
    I thought the gap from plate was the same on the other router and even checked it twice - still wrong.
    Now I need a shim packer to switch between routers - I'll live. (I think the dimensions provided are now correct)

  8. #7
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    May 2012
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    Woodstock (Cowra)
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    Thank you for plans x10
    The person who never made a mistake never made anything

    Cheers
    Ray

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Campbelltown NSW
    Age
    76
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by champs View Post
    Last time I 3d printed anything near this size it took forever and warped a lot and also provided a few bird nests, good luck
    I can add the diagonal ribs and send an stl file if you are that crazy - the threads would probably be better as a captured nut, I can envisage it but you can draw it
    Thanks for the plans. This gives me an opportunity to practice with Fusion360. I had thought of an encapsulated nut or a slot for a square gutter bolt nut.

    Another thought was using a threaded rod with inner and outer nuts which may be more secure than a clamping screw on a rod and easier construction. Probably more fiddling though setting up in practice.

    I agree that prints can take time but the advantage is that I can be doing other things while itís working.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
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    Fusion was where I did my retrospective drawing, consider bringing the lock nut in from the side, then the captured nut can drop in a vertical slot.
    You can also trim out a lot of bulk and add ribbing to bring the stiffness up.
    I've come up with a cleverish way of adding an aluminium diagonal brace for metal version, will post when it is done.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sydney
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    I was pondering how to clamp a 45 degree edge into a corner when it all became obvious.
    Clamp a square into the corner, do all the tap size drilling together on one end (label carefully).
    Flip it over and do the same for the other end.
    Cut the thing in half at 45 degrees, then do the tapping, clearance hole drilling and countersink.

    Here I've used 80 x 10 flat bar just because I have some kicking around.
    I milled the hell out of it until it was square because the 100mm angle Al is not square or flat.
    This will pull it all into shape and hopefully hold it there.

    Brace.jpg

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    60

    Default

    More or less finished
    Fwiw I shimmed for the festool with .8mm Aluminium flashing - again because I had it kicking around, it's super easy to cut and won't create a galvanic reaction on this jig. Seems to be right for festool now. 10mm is still fine for makita trimmer plunge base.
    Good luck measuring 10.8mm if making for this router.
    Keep in mind the holes are a little oversize so they slide, this also means a little pull in when the lock nuts are tightened. These offsets allow for it.
    My 6mm spiral upcut also arrived today along with 8mm collet for trimmer router.
    Just waiting for plastic knob locking screws and should probably add a handle or hold down knob.
    It has also dawned on me that if you wanted a mini router table for small pieces, the domino wannabe has you covered, just need a throat insert.

    Braced1.jpg Braced2.jpg

  13. #12
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    Jan 2005
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    Campbelltown NSW
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    Quote Originally Posted by champs View Post
    Fusion was where I did my retrospective drawing, consider bringing the lock nut in from the side, then the captured nut can drop in a vertical slot.
    You can also trim out a lot of bulk and add ribbing to bring the stiffness up.
    I've come up with a cleverish way of adding an aluminium diagonal brace for metal version, will post when it is done.

    I was thinking much along the same lines. I initially had the slot horizontal, parallel with 8mm hole but from the top leaves a bit of meat around the entry exit points of the 8mm hole, although I don't think it matters that much as the rod is being pushed away from that those points. I added braces mainly to stop flexing as that could be an issue with the material. The 3D model can be viewed here.

    I made a couple of blocks to test the clamping strength and after applying way to much force the 10% infill one started to compress the material (PLA+) but the 35% infill one stayed solid.

    IMG_5862.jpg IMG_5861.jpg

    Now, I haven't printed the model mainly because I haven't got a Makita to test for fit and practicality and with the settings I'm using it is a 36 hour print for each side which is not an issue.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Sydney
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    Not too bad, the power of 3D printing is doing the things that are painful by regular means
    I've sketched on your model where you could easily thin to a web, all lumpy corners can be radiused, no strength reduction but a fair bit of plastic and time saved.
    Internal corners radiused will substantially add strength
    In between the diagonal braces you could add a dust extraction port - or slides to accept a separate printed part

    Domino Plate_snapshot(1).png

  15. #14
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    Jan 2005
    Location
    Campbelltown NSW
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    Default

    Thanks, I had considered the option of internal fillets and initially was going to print on the edge to save on supports, however when the throat was added I added the braces and removed them. What takes time is the support build for the the clamping block which adds around 10 hours at the current print speed of 40mm/s.

    To do away with the supports, I am considering printing the clamping block separately with threaded holes and attach to the top plate with screws (and glue?) and push the print speed up a little which altogether will cut the print time to almost in half.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
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    Default

    Add a dovetail slide joint to the plate and screw block, if ABS then smear with acetone, slide it in and it will never move again - would look awesome in two tone.

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