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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    23,393

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Poloris View Post
    This is just a update.
    The switch I ordered from China arrived, however it was non-latching so I chose to return it.
    Return economy postage to China was $28.45 that is $3 less than purchase price.
    I think most people would have kept it but I want the switch I payed for, and I know E-bay will refund return postage if I follow their rules.
    Well . . . . . . I did suggest that?
    I suspect they don't have a latching switch type pedal and if they decide to supply one, chances are they will grab any old latching switch and fit that.
    I would now consider looking for a relay based solution.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bundaberg
    Age
    50
    Posts
    1,826

    Default

    Perhaps a change of router?

    Fixed base routers are hugely popular in the US but the only thing I personally can see in their favour is the large base diameter.

    My personal favourite for dovetail jigs is a Makita 3601 "D" handled unit. It has a low COG and still allows two handled control but for your application the clincher is the trigger on/off set in the handle. And the base takes Porter-Cable type screw-in guide bushes.
    A thief stole my anti-depressants. I hope hes happy now.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    470

    Default

    What you want is a latching relay. These can be bought for around $79, but if memory serves they generally use separate on & off switches. Have not looked at these recently, and there will now be a lot of solid state versions that may have additional functions. However, you can build a very low cost & simple system that uses low voltage control circuit (say 12v) to toggle the mains power. That way you could build your own foot switch design as there will be no dangerous power going any where near the foot switch.

    Eg. See this Toggle Switch No.1 - Cmos 4013.

    This even has the Veroboard layout designed.

    Just substitute a relay with mains rated contacts at appropriate amperage for your tool, and DO NOT mount the reply on same board as the low voltage components!! A few uses at Jaycqr would buy the parts.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    143

    Default Latching Relay

    Yes I was considering using a arduino and relay with latching software untill I saw the supposed latching foot switch that I ordered.
    The seller of that switch no longer lables it as latching and says he will refund my payment once he receives the returned switch.
    .
    I have looked at the Makita 3601b and believe the dewalt I already own will be fine on the leigh jig.
    I don't really need to use a foot switch as the start up jerk is not so bad, but I don't like to leave anything to chance and it doesn't take much to ruin dovetails when cutting them with a router.
    So now I'm looking at what is available online and I still need a foot switch.
    Mark
    I've become a tool of my tools.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    23,393

    Default

    There's no need for an Arduino or to use an expensive mains V latching relay.

    It could be done for example using a $5 SS low V (e.g. 12V) latching relay that drives a standard low cost 10A Mains V relay.
    You'd need a 12 V power pack in series with a momentary foot switch that supplies a latching signal to the standard relay.

    I'd post a circuit but I would probably get told off so I won't. PM me for details if you are interested.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    143

    Default Re-handled

    The latching foot switch idea got way too complicated, so I re-examained my issues with the dewalt router.
    I found the little slippery knobs on the dewalt were difficult to hold cantilevered over a edge.
    I just could not wrap my hands around them, I could only hold them by my fingertips.
    So I made new handles that I could reach the switch from.
    Solving both problems.
    The handles were made by metalworking methods so I will make a further post in the metalworking forum.
    Mark
    Attached Images Attached Images
    I've become a tool of my tools.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney Upper North Shore
    Posts
    3,352

    Default

    Nice!

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    2,888

    Default

    Great solution.
    Regards,
    Bob

    Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

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