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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Brisbane, QLD
    Posts
    122

    Default Beginner finishing question

    Hi all,

    I have what Iím hoping is a very simple question to respond to. I completed my first proper furniture build a few months back - a walnut coffee table. I decided to finish it with Osmo PolyX in a matte finish as I understood it to be hard wearing. I filled the grain with a paste made from fine sawdust and the Osmo to remove any open pores and proceeded to out 3-4 coats on the table top. I followed an instructional from a recent FWW article.

    The finish turned out great, but now to my horror - even the slightest amount of moisture leaves terrible clouded marks!!! Itís not super obvious, but is visible from certain angles when I look along the top.

    What have I done wrong? Whatís best to fix it? Strip back and start again?

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. As itís my first proper build, the table has a special place in my heart, despite some of its flaws.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    573

    Default

    Hi jw,

    That sounds very strange. PolyX is usually very protective. I suggest you drop a line to the Osmo distributor in Australia http://www.osmoaustralia.com.au/ They should be able to help. I’d be very grateful if you could keep us posted of what you find.

    Thanks and good luck!

    Brian

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Brisbane, QLD
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Good idea Brian. Iíve sent an email off.

    I was of the understanding that a wipe on poly would be perfect to counteract those accidental spills and provide a robust finish. Itís quite disappointing, especially when I did hours of research on application before applying the stuff. Perhaps user error on my part being new to this stuff.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    573

    Default

    jw,

    Youíre spot on that a wipe on poly would be good for accidental spills. Osmo PolyX, though, is not a poly(urethane) but a blend of hard wax and oils - a very different animal. I still would have expected it to resist the odd spill, though.

    Brian

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Brisbane, QLD
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Ah! Right you are, Brian. Notwithstanding, and as you say, I expected a bit more resilience. Iíll wait to see what Osmo says. Iíll keep you posted when I get a response from them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    441

    Default

    What did you sand the timber to and what was your finishing process?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Brisbane, QLD
    Posts
    122

    Default

    G'day Hurcorh, timber was sanded to 600 in raw state. Applied first coat of oil and let soak for 15 mins or so (as per directons on tin), then sanded while still wet to get a paste going to fill the grain. This worked OK, but not as I had hoped so i let dry, sanded from 240-600 and wiped on a new layer of oil, though this time it was combined with saw dust to create a paste and worked into the grain. I let that dry and sanded (with random orbital sander to 400 grit, then by hand to 600 grit. The grain filled well at this point, so I applied 3 more coats with 1-2 day drying times between coats. I also sanded lightly between coats with 600 and 800 grit to get as smooth as I could. Cheers.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,135

    Default

    For what it's worth, try sanding the wood to 600, then add the oil and sand through to 1500-2000. Use the ROS all the way. This should seal the oil into the boards. WIpe down with a cotton cloth and see how that goes. Just a suggestion.

    Regards,

    Rob

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    441

    Default

    I sand no further than 180, use the osmo roller to apply a very thin coat. After 24 hrs, buff in another coat with a white abrasive pad and remove excess. After allowing to cure for a week it is very durable.

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