Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Needs Pictures Needs Pictures:  0
Picture(s) thanks Picture(s) thanks:  0
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Valla Beach
    Posts
    872

    Default Finishes on open grained timber versus closed grain timber

    Hi, I've been applying my favourite finish which is a couple of coats of danish oil, cut in with 400 or 800 wet and dry; followed by a couple of coats of wax buffed in. The result I get on say red mahogany is exceptionally nice and smooth, feels awesome. Then I apply that same finish to silky oak, and whilst its a very nice finish I feel its not quite as good as on the red mahogany.

    I believe this is due to the grains of each timber. The red mahogany to me is a very closed grain timber but the silky oak seems to be a lot more open grained.

    Any suggestions on how one may improve this finish,..?

    Regards, Paul

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Age
    61
    Posts
    1,540

    Default

    You would normally fill an open grained timber with a Grain Filler. I'll not name any as my UK brands are probably not the same as your Aus Brands. But somebody will be along shortly with the names you need.
    Dragonfly
    No-one suspects the dragonfly!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Newcastle NSW
    Posts
    105

    Default

    Hi Paul

    I'd have to agree with dragonfly that the "proper" technigue would be to use a grain filler. I know some people recommend choosing a colour match of TimberMate, mixing it with water to a consistency of mayonnaise, then wiping it over the timber. Once dried, sand back to the wood.

    Having said that, I suppose it depend what sort of finish you intend. While I have used a filler in several cases, I must admit I'm not a huge fan (though bear in mind I am no expert and only in winter can I claim to have an IQ equivalent to room temperature). In this thread (in Finishing) I've outlined how impressed I was with LGS's Hard Burnished Oil finish on an open grained timber - and silky oak isn't as open as meranti or Tassie Oak.

    Even if worst comes to worst, it is easy to sand it back and you've lost nothing, but I doubt you'll want to do that since the finish is superb, durable and long-lasting.

    Cheerio
    Moi
    "Come sit down beside me" I said to myself, and although it didn't make sense,
    I held my own hand as a small sign of trust, and together I sat on the fence.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,138

    Default

    Hi Paul,

    This is hard burnished Silky Oak. The finish is as smooth as I get with something like Red Gum.

    Regards,

    Rob
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Valla Beach
    Posts
    872

    Default

    Hi, and thanks Gentlemen, LGS, exactly what is the brand name of that product you used in that photo. The finish does look exceptionally superb.
    Paul

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,138

    Default

    Hi Paul,

    The product is Wattyl Teak (Scandinavian) Oil. That is how it is labelled on the can. You can't buy it at Bunnings, but most hardware and paint shops should stock it. I buy at Master's where it is approx $38.00 a litre, but you can buy it in 500ml and 200ml cans as well.
    Be great to see the results.
    Oh and remember it's always best to try out on some scrap first!

    Regards,

    Rob

Similar Threads

  1. Open Grained Satin Lacquer Finish?
    By stevec1234 in forum MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 5th Nov 2010, 09:47 PM
  2. Recommendation for fine grained timber
    By ybabe in forum TIMBER
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17th Sep 2010, 08:36 AM
  3. French Polishing Open Grain Timber
    By Kev-in Melb in forum FINISHING
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 21st Apr 2006, 08:57 PM
  4. open or closed grain timber
    By mkarsz in forum FINISHING
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 7th Sep 2005, 11:37 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •