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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Port Hedland WA
    Posts
    3

    Default Jarrah Bar top slab prep, help!

    Hello everyone first time here.
    Woodwork experience minimal!

    I need some detail on how to prep a slab of Jarrah, I have purchased for my bar top.
    It has been cut to size and has had a fairly smooth cut done by the saw mill. It has a natural timber edge and some cracks on both sides.
    Do I need to sand it back to real smooth first?
    I am thinking a clear top coat to cover it due to bottles and cans being rested on it, so what type to use?
    Also what do I use to bring out the grain and knots etc, some type of oil or will this affect the clear coat?


    Regards Jason

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    western australia South West
    Posts
    766

    Default dusteater

    Just come across your post have you resolved your dilema yet?

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    3,260

    Default

    As a quick indication...

    Polyester finishes (estapol and so on) are widely used as they are reasonably tough and can withstand spill and so on; however, when they start to go, your only option is to refinish them. Another possible option is - HARD SHELLAC - New improved formula finish. (made by the sponsor of this forum).

    For an even tougher finish, you can go to epoxy, but like polyester they tend to leave the wood looking a bit too plastic-y for my taste.

    If it was me, I'd be contemplating a tung oil finish, or maybe coated it with the hard shellac from the link above. I have a soft spot for oil as it can build up over time and accept dings and dents as part of the piece, rather than detracting from it.

    And yes, you will need to prep the surface more...you may get away with just sanding, or you might need to construct a router sled to help even it out.

    The rough (wany) edge can be 'sanded' with one of those polyester 'wire brushes' that go in a drill (its like a wire brush, but the bristles are plastic), and this'll help knock off loose bark.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Eastern Australia
    Posts
    604

    Default

    Now my misses bought a benchtop for the computer. It was plastic wrap. In time it peeled and it finished as a craftwood top. Toi cut a long story short, I milled boards of Merbeau,which were sold as decking and jointed and glued them to this top. After sanding I used the dewaxed Shellac master Splinter says to use. Its now 2 years old, Ive spilled grog My son eats pies on it and no one really looks after it. I did have to remove an ink stain but that was easy, otherwise its perfect.
    So I for one go for the Hard shellac from above. Thank you U Bute

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Port Hedland WA
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Thanks to everyone for the response, my computer had a melt down so I have not been able to respond as quickly as I liked.
    I have sanded the Jarrah slab right back with a 320 grit paper with an orbital sander. I found some local help and was told to areldite the cracks and fill with some of the jarrah saw dust left over from trimming the slab.I sanded those back to the 320 grit also. Cleaned up with compressed air and was given a 2 pack epoxy called Concresive 2525 clear coat finish generally used to give a harden finish to protect concrete floors in workshops etc.
    I have only completed one coat on the under side so far to tune in my woodcraft skills and it looks impressive so far. Up to three coats can be applied to give some extra depth, still havent applied those yet.

    Will post pics once finished, thanks again!

    Jason

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    3,260

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Master Splinter View Post
    Polyester
    D'oh. Should be polyurethane!

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Port Hedland WA
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Master Splinter can you forsee an issue by using the concresive epoxy?

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