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  1. #1
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    Default Removing air from cans of finish

    As I dumped another can of finish that has gone off. I was wondering if it would benefit if I could expel the air in the can and replace it with carbon dioxide. Along with keeping the can as cool as possible I was thinking this might increase the opened can shelf life.
    Any coments or other suggestions.
    Lyle.

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  3. #2
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    Perhaps you could put some other inert material in the can to raise the level of the fluid to where it was when it was a new can.

  4. #3
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    Marbles work well, even help with mixing, but you can also get collapsable containers to expand air (like these http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/5L-Collap...item2c9b8c1c0c but there are black ones too for protections from light)
    Neil
    ____________________________________________
    Every day presents an opportunity to learn something new

  5. #4
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    One way that I've been told, is to put Glad wrap on top of paint/finish/? So that majority of air is expelled, with the Glad wrap sitting like a bag, coming outside of the can and sealed with the lid on.
    A friend told me this and has cans sitting for about 3 years.
    Kryn
    Last edited by KBs PensNmore; 25th Aug 2015 at 11:18 PM. Reason: spealing missteak

  6. #5
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    Default 100 Jobs To Do

    I heard that you could use a product called "Bloxygen" to revive your finishes that has gone off.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike100jobstodo View Post
    I heard that you could use a product called "Bloxygen" to revive your finishes that has gone off.
    Bloxygen does not revive a finish that has gone off.

    Bloxygen is used to replace the air above the remaining finish in a can with a heavier than air gas that prevents the remaining finish from going off. I used to use it when I was living in Canada a few years ago. It's not a cheap solution, and the degree of success that you'll have is very dependant on your technique when you inject the gas into the can, and on the quality of the seal on the finish container. I managed to keep part used cans of Oil Based PolyU that had been treated with Bloxygen for at least two years, when a half tin of the same PolyU without Bloxygen would go off in less than a year.

    I haven't bothered to continue using Bloxygen since I returned to Australia, mainly because now that I'm retired, I tend to use up cans of finish much quicker than when I was a weekend only woodworker.

    Bloxgen is available in Australia from two outlets that I am aware of. I think that ALS Speciality Marine is the Australian importer, so they should be able to tell you who the other stockists are.




    Regards,

    RoyG
    Manufacturer of the Finest Quality Off-Cuts.

  8. #7
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    I normally put the finish in a plastic bottle and squeeze it to the top. This will help a little but I think the best way is buy the smallest quantity possible for the job. You pay more for a smaller tin but waste less.

    OR use MinWax wipe-on poly. It lasts 2-3 years. It's amazing.
    Visit my website at www.myWoodwork.com.au

  9. #8
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    I have seen on youtube a fellow crush the can to expel the air. I can see some merit to this logic but I don't like the idea of crushing a can.

    My reasoning behind this comes from cans of food. One thing that I was told, if a can of food is dented in anyway then do not buy or use it as the integrity of the can has been compromised. I might be over reacting with cans of finish.

  10. #9
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    Australia
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    It is the Minwax WOP that I have in the rectangular tins. I keep opened tins in an old esky deep under the bench (coolest and darkest place I can).
    I was thinking of the soda syphon CO2 bulbs and using a modified 'injector' or even an empty whipped creamer to expel the air from the tin.
    Would keeping the tin in a cool dark place with the air expelled with CO2 prolong the shelf life?

    Lyle.

  11. #10
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    I purchased half a dozen of these earlier this year: http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/pag...190,44133&ap=1

    They are cheap and work quite well.

  12. #11
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    Default

    Thanks groenai.
    Are theyreuaeable. I couldn't see on the site.

  13. #12
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    If you have a TIG or MIG welder and argon cylinder handy, you can use the argon to displace the air in the can. Bloxygen in industrial size cylinders, if you will.

  14. #13
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    Bloxygen = argon. Great. I'mm gunna get some and try it out. It would work better than the CO2 I was thinking about.
    Cost will be the equaliser.
    Half a tin of WOP is about $15. If the cost of the Bloxygen is about equal than the savings will be good.
    I have sent an email to the Aust distributor asking for cost and delivery.
    Last edited by Lyle; 27th Aug 2015 at 08:26 AM. Reason: additional line

  15. #14
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    How about LPG ... it's heavier than air and should displace the air in the tin without too much trouble.

    Just put out your cigarette before opening the tin next time you go to use it.
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
    __________________________________________________
    Bite off more than you can chew and then chew like crazy.

  16. #15
    Join Date
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    Default

    Aust distributor for Bloxygen returned with $30 delivered to PC 2318.
    Lee Valley has the Finish Storage bags (qty 6) for $US26.50 posted. Approximately $Aus 6.00 each.
    Now I need to decide which to try.

    I can possibly clean out the Finish Storage bags and re-use them. So that will reduce their intial cost over time.

    The Bloxygen is capable of PROVIDES ABOUT 75 USES IN LITRE CANS. So I suspect that will be enough for many tins.

    So I will have a think before buying either.

    Thanks for the inputs so far.
    Lyle.

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