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  1. #16
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    I think 30 minutes wait was a little too short.

    I am guessing that your thoughts would have been in line of a more constant colour for the whole top. This type of joinery is always going to give you some variations but I don't think it looks bad.

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  3. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christos View Post
    I think 30 minutes wait was a little too short.

    I am guessing that your thoughts would have been in line of a more constant colour for the whole top. This type of joinery is always going to give you some variations but I don't think it looks bad.
    Is there a way of stripping the stain and having another go with a weaker stain?.

  4. #18
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    Hi Sam,

    I agree with ian. Also, that looks like a good result to me, and pretty normal for spirit stain, but then I like to see some (lots of) variation in my timber. Timber is naturally very variable and absorbs stain differently depending on grain direction and other considerations such as density. With finger jointed tops like the rubberwood the grain goes in different directions, 'higgledy piggledly' and the density varies from piece to piece.

    The only way to get a more uniform result would be to use a pigmented 'stain' rather than a spirit or water stain. The latter two are absorbed into the timber (often differentially) but the pigment-based 'stains' and finishes - usually used outdoors in the sunlight - will provide a more uniform look.

    David

  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sheeny71 View Post
    Is there a way of stripping the stain and having another go with a weaker stain?.
    There is but that would require you to sand the finish and then use the same type of medium(eg Mentholated Sprits) on a clean cloth to pull out the stain. There will be a chance that some of the stain will not come out of the wood. Personally I don't think it is worth while spending so much time removing this stain. If you really don't like this top then you can make another top and use this one on another project. Your options are not always limited to the one piece.

    Try using the coffee table for a year or so and see if this grows on you.

    The coffee table that I made for my house is always covered with paper or magazines so no one sees it.

  6. #20
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    Hi Sam,

    I agree with Christos. If you have not sealed it then just a good soak with metho (denatured alcohol) will reduce the intensity of the stain - except that it will still be unevenly stained because of the changes in grain direction. Pour the metho on liberally and let it soak in then mop up with rags or paper towel. Good ventilation will help prevent drunkenness!

    If you have applied a seal coat of some kind that needs to be removed first. As I said above, the only way to get a more even stain is with a pigment finish as that coats everything.

    No one can see the colour of my wife's benches because they are covered with plastic and paper as well as a lot of art materials, so the actual finish may not be important in practice - as for Christos' coffee table.

    David

  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xanthorrhoeas View Post
    Hi Sam,

    I agree with Christos. If you have not sealed it then just a good soak with metho (denatured alcohol) will reduce the intensity of the stain - except that it will still be unevenly stained because of the changes in grain direction. Pour the metho on liberally and let it soak in then mop up with rags or paper towel. Good ventilation will help prevent drunkenness!

    If you have applied a seal coat of some kind that needs to be removed first. As I said above, the only way to get a more even stain is with a pigment finish as that coats everything.

    No one can see the colour of my wife's benches because they are covered with plastic and paper as well as a lot of art materials, so the actual finish may not be important in practice - as for Christos' coffee table.

    David
    G'day Dave, I decided to strip the stain and bleach some of the finger joins to make things more even. I know a few of you might think I'm crazy, my wife would totally agree there!. Anyway whats done is done now so I'm back to square one with the top. This time I plan to apply both sanding sealer and timber primer but I don't know in which order, this is where I need some advice. Both Timber Primer and Sanding Sealer are Feast Watson.

    I will be keeping this thread updated until the very end of the project, along with photo's at different stages. Also, I have another project after this one (oh no I hear you gasp!), its an old chair which I picked up second hand and needs sanding and finishing but no staining this time!, I'll need some advice from you good people again.

    Thanks,

    Sam

  8. #22
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    Hi Sam, I have no experience with Feast Watson sanding sealer or timber primer so I will have to hand over to the paint specialists.

    With the chair it may be a good idea to post photos before you do anything to it. There are quite a few expereinced restorers here.

    Good luck
    David

  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xanthorrhoeas View Post
    Hi Sam, I have no experience with Feast Watson sanding sealer or timber primer so I will have to hand over to the paint specialists.

    With the chair it may be a good idea to post photos before you do anything to it. There are quite a few expereinced restorers here.

    Good luck
    David
    I'll be starting a new thread for the chair, I'd be grateful of any input from you on that project too.

  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sheeny71 View Post
    I'm back to square one with the top. This time I plan to apply both sanding sealer and timber primer but I don't know in which order, this is where I need some advice. Both Timber Primer and Sanding Sealer are Feast Watson.
    Hi Sam, please don't.

    For what you are trying to achieve, you do not need the Timber Primer.
    Repeat -- leave the Timber Primer in the can.

    Having sanded back to bare wood, give the top a coat of sanding sealer. Let the sealer dry for longer than recommended, then lightly sand.
    This should give you a pretty uniform base onto which to apply your stain. Be warned though, it's unlikely that you will get an uniform colour.
    regards from Canada

    ian

  11. #25
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    This material is used a lot in commercial contexts and the usual approach is to spray a varnish stain (ie stain mixed into the varnish). It's probably not the ideal finish in most people's mind, but it overcomes the patchiness. Spraying guarantees an even coat thickness, but with this flat topped table a brush will work.
    Apologies for unnoticed autocomplete errors.

  12. #26
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    I was just wondering, is there a process in which you use two or three different strength's of stain on different parts of the wood to even out/compensate for the variations in wood light/dark patches?. If there is, would I just use turps to thin the stain mixture?.

  13. #27
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    If the stain is a spirit stain then you would thin it with metho. Oil stains are thinned with turps.

  14. #28
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    Default Final Finish

    Firstly, thanks to everyone for their help, suggestions and advice. As promised I have uploaded some photo's of the final finish. In the end I decided to use some of the F&W stain thinned down to give it a lighter tone, then I gave the top 7 coats of Rustoleum Clear Spray, wet sanded it to a semi-gloss sheen. I'm fairly happy with the finish, however in the future I will use a 2pack spray as its alot harder wearing.

    _DSC0225a.jpg_DSC0226b.jpg_DSC0230c.jpg

    Now thats over, I need some help restoring an old chair!.

  15. #29
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    Well done, it looks good and very serviceable.

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